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I am new to bash, but this should be a very common scenario. I have the following bash "pseudoscript"

VAR1=oldValue
VAR2=var2

COMMAND="-option1 "$VAR1" -option2 "$VAR2

run $COMMAND $OTHERSTUFF

VAR1=newValue

run $COMMAND $OTHERSTUFF
#$COMMAND is stil using oldValue

Should I use eval to generate a new value for the COMMAND variable?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use an array

options=( -option1 x -option2 y )

options[1]=oldValue
options[3]=var2
run "${options[@]}" "$OTHERSTUFF"

options[1]=newValue
run "${options[@]}" "$OTHERSTUFF"

If you don't want to assign directly to the array, use functions to encapsulate the gory details:

initialize_options() { options=( -option1 x -option2 y ); }

set_first()  { set_value 1 "$1"; }
set_second() { set_value 3 "$1"; }
set_value()  { option[$1]="$2"; }

initialize_options

set_first oldValue
set_second var2
run "${options[@]}" "$OTHERSTUFF"

set_first newValue
run "${options[@]}" "$OTHERSTUFF"

Thought just occurred to me -- this might be simpler:

do_run() { run -option1 "$1" -option2 "$2" "$OTHERSTUFF"; }

VAR1=oldValue
VAR2=var2
do_run "$VAR1" "$VAR2"

VAR1=newValue
do_run "$VAR1" "$VAR2"
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$COMMAND has the old value because in BASH the $VAR1 and $VAR2 are substituted for their actual values when it is initially assigned. If you want COMMAND to be updated with the new VAR1 value, you could go about it like this:

run -option1="$VAR1" -option2="$VAR2" $otherStuff

eval() is inefficient (since you are parsing some code twice) and must be used with care.

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I am a newbie myself, but I think the problem is, that the command-variable will not change because, you must must set it to the new value. In the $command will remain your old content othwerwise

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You should be putting the value you set to COMMAND in single quotes so that the variable is not interpolated on the spot. Then use eval when you run $COMMAND so that the string in COMMAND is interpolated after COMMAND is interpolated to that string, like so:

var1=hello

cmd='echo $var1'

eval $cmd

var1=goodbye

eval $cmd

I must say that this is a pretty irregular way of going about things. You should simply be resetting COMMAND rather than embedding some kind of pseudo-dynamic reference to a variable in it.

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