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With this code:

private bool AtLeastOnePlatypusChecked()
{
    return ((ckbx1.IsChecked) ||
            (ckbx2.IsChecked) ||
            (ckbx3.IsChecked) ||
            (ckbx4.IsChecked));
}

...I'm stopped dead in my tracks with

Operator '||' cannot be applied to operands of type 'bool?' and 'bool?

So how do I accomplish this?

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In this case, four. –  B. Clay Shannon Dec 18 '12 at 22:02
1  

6 Answers 6

up vote 30 down vote accepted

You can chain together |s, using the null-coalescing operator at the end:

return (ckbx1.IsChecked | cxbx2.IsChecked | cxbx3.IsChecked | cxbx4.IsChecked) ?? false;

The lifted | operator returns true if either operand is true, false if both operands are false, and null if either operand is null and the other isn't true.

It's not short-circuiting, but I don't think that'll be a problem for you in this case.

Alternatively - and more extensibly - put the checkboxes into a collection of some kind. Then you can just use:

return checkboxes.Any(cb => cb.IsChecked ?? false);
share|improve this answer
    
Finally I know what "lifted" means. I encountered this term when working with expression trees. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Dec 18 '12 at 22:05
    
I was curious about that term too, but it looks like Jon has already answered that question –  Mike Christensen Dec 18 '12 at 22:21
    
I have re-voted for this. Wow that's sexy. –  Simon Whitehead Dec 18 '12 at 22:26
    
I believe the | operand doesn't use short-circuit evaluation, so there is potentially a slight performance impact, probably negligible for this example. –  Joe Dec 18 '12 at 22:31
1  
@JeppeStigNielsen: And I fixed that bug in Roslyn before I left. I am no longer one of "those guys". :-) –  Eric Lippert Dec 19 '12 at 0:21

Try:

return ((ckbx1.IsChecked ?? false) ||
        (ckbx2.IsChecked ?? false) ||
        ...
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Darnit, beat me to it! –  Bob. Dec 18 '12 at 22:01

I'm assuming that if null, then it'll be false, you can use the ?? operator.

 private bool AtLeastOnePlatypusChecked()
 {
      return ((ckbx1.IsChecked ?? false) ||
      (ckbx2.IsChecked ?? false) ||
      (ckbx3.IsChecked ?? false) ||
      (ckbx4.IsChecked ?? false));
 }
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You can use GetValueOrDefault() to get either the value, or false.

private bool AtLeastOnePlatypusChecked()
{
    return ((ckbx1.IsChecked.GetValueOrDefault()) ||
            (ckbx2.IsChecked.GetValueOrDefault()) ||
            (ckbx3.IsChecked.GetValueOrDefault()) ||
            (ckbx4.IsChecked.GetValueOrDefault()));
}
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You can use the following:

(ckbx1.IsChecked.HasValue && ckbx1.IsChecked.Value)
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Somehow this "feels" nicer.. –  Simon Whitehead Dec 18 '12 at 22:00
2  
Should the || be the && operator? If cbx1.IsChecked.HasValue is false then there will be a Null Reference when getting ckbx1.IsChecked.Value. –  Shane Charles Dec 18 '12 at 22:09

Use ?? operator inside your method;

private bool AtLeastOnePlatypusChecked()
{
return ((ckbx1.IsChecked ?? false) ||
        (ckbx2.IsChecked ?? false) ||
        (ckbx3.IsChecked ?? false) ||
        (ckbx4.IsChecked ?? false)
}
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