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I have char* MESSAGE = new char[256]; and char* DISCONNECT = new char[256]; however when I use winsock to send them from the client and recieve them in the server (the server has the same char names) for some reason char* MESSAGE intercepts char* DISCONNECT any help on why this is would be great!.

Cient:

private: System::Void Form1_FormClosing(System::Object^  sender, System::Windows::Forms::FormClosingEventArgs^  e) {
         char* Disconnect = new char[256];
         ZeroMemory(Disconnect, sizeof(Disconnect));
         Disconnect = "DC";
         send(sConnect, "DC", 256, NULL);
     }

private: System::Void txtMessage_KeyDown(System::Object^  sender, System::Windows::Forms::KeyEventArgs^  e) {
         if(e->KeyCode == Keys::Enter && txtMessage->Text != "")
         {
             char* MESSAGE = new char[sizeof(txtMessage->Text->Length)];
             ZeroMemory(MESSAGE, sizeof(MESSAGE));

             string strMESSAGE = "";

             MarshalString(txtMessage->Text, strMESSAGE);

             send(sConnect, strMESSAGE.c_str(), strMESSAGE.length(), NULL);
             txtMessage->Clear();
         }
     }

Server:

int RecieveThread()
{
ZeroMemory(MESSAGE, sizeof(MESSAGE));
for (;; Sleep(50))
{
    if(recv(sConnect, MESSAGE, 256, NULL) != SOCKET_ERROR)
    {
        printf("<%s:> %s\n", NAME, MESSAGE);
    }
}
return 0;
}

int DisconnectThread()
{
ZeroMemory(Disconnect, sizeof(Disconnect));
for(;; Sleep(50))
{
    if(recv(sConnect, Disconnect, 256, NULL) != SOCKET_ERROR)
    {
        if (Disconnect == "DC")
        {
            printf("has disconnected.");
        }
    }
}
return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
sizeof(Disconnect) is most certainly not 256. –  chris Dec 18 '12 at 22:16
    
shouldn't strMESSAGE in your client be MESSAGE? –  Krister Andersson Dec 18 '12 at 22:21
    
@chris if I could select a comment as an answer I would, I can't believe I made such a noob mistake and didn't even notice. Haha thanks. Also is there any reason why after Disconnect is recieved if I compare if (Disconnect == "DC") that apparently Disconnect does not equal "DC"? –  Ian Lundberg Dec 18 '12 at 22:26
    
@IanLundberg, Really, that fixed it? Anyway, you're comparing two pointers there, not strings. I'd highly suggest using std::vector<char> to hold your characters instead and either making a std::string out of it to compare, or using std::equal. If you still want the arrays, use strncmp. –  chris Dec 18 '12 at 22:32
    
I didn't see this before, but you can't assign to pointers to copy it, either. You should use strncpy for that. By this, I'm talking about Disconnect = "DC";. If you never need to pass modifiable characters, you can skip the vector and use std::string off the bat as well. –  chris Dec 18 '12 at 22:39

1 Answer 1

Among the other errors mentioned in the comments, your use of recv is a problem waiting to happen. The recv function reads up to the number of bytes you specify, not exactly that number. If you get fewer bytes, you need to call recv again.

Also, never throw away the return value from recv. It's the only way to know how many bytes of data you actually got.

The TCP layer has no idea that you consider 256 bytes an application-layer message. It does not glue those bytes together. Only your code knows that, so it's your code's responsibility to put the messages back together when they are received.

share|improve this answer
1  
It's a classic! –  Martin James Dec 19 '12 at 13:49

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