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so I have a question regarding dictionaries in Python. I'd like to create a dictionary where the user will be prompted with 2 options; either updating the dictionary or clearing the dictionary. Let me first show you my code:

def myStuff():
    food = {'Apple': 0, 'Banana': 0, 'Grapes': 0}
    choice = raw_input('Please pick an option:\n1) Update number of food I have\n2) Clear all\n>>')
    if choice == str(1):
        apple = int(raw_input('How many apples do you want to add?\n>>'))
        banana = int(raw_input('How many bananas do you want to add?\n>>'))
        grapes = int(raw_input('How many grapes do you want to add?\n>>'))
        print 'Updating...'
        food['Apple'] = apple
        food['Banana'] = banana
        food['Grapes'] = grapes
        print  food
    elif choice == str(2):
        food['Apple'] = 0
        food['Banana'] = 0
        food['Grapes'] = 0
        print food
    else:
        return False

myStuff()

Now here's what I'd like to add:

1.The ability for the user to keep updating the dictionary (which means that if someone input 10 apples, the dictionary will store 10 apples and the user will be prompted again to input the number of apples he want to input to update the dictionary). I'm not really sure how to implement a loop into this.

2, The ability for the user to clear his dictionary after updating it. For example: if someone inputs 10 apples, the loop will ask the user again if he/she would like to clear the dictionary.

It's kind of like a bank where someone deposits money and clears their account if they don't have any money left in there account.

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

With what you are doing, it might be better to create your own class. You should also have different functions for all of the different actions you wish to do. ie. Update, Clear, Add

class Fruit:
    Apple = 0
    Banana = 0
    Grape = 0

    def __repr__(self):
         return "You have {self.Apple} apples, {self.Banana} bananas, and {self.Grape} grapes".format(**locals())

    def update(self):
       while 1:
         choice = raw_input('Please pick an option:\n1) Update number of food I have\n2) Clear all\n>>')
         if (int(choice) == 1):
            self.Add()
         elif (int(choice) == 2):
            self.Clear()
         else:
             print "Input not valid"

    def Add(self):
       self.Apple += int(raw_input('How many apples do you want to add?\n>>'))
       self.Banana += int(raw_input('How many bananas do you want to add?\n>>'))
       self.Grape += int(raw_input('How many grapes do you want to add?\n>>'))
       print self

    def Clear(self):
       self.Apple = 0
       self.Banana = 0
       self.Grape = 0
       print self

if __name__ == "__main__":
    fruit = Fruit()
    fruit.update()         

You should also look in to using try and except statements to make sure the program does not crash if the wrong input is used. Also you should add in an exit command to exit the program, otherwise this will loop forever. for example. if the user input is "exit" then have a conditional notice it and break.

share|improve this answer

You can do that this way:

"""
in each loop check the fruit number to see if it is 0 or not.if it
is 0, then this means that you don't want to add fruit from the current 
type and skips to the nextFruit.Focus on the code and you realize the other parts.
"""    

import string

def myStuff():
    food = {'Apples': 0, 'Bananas': 0, 'Grapes': 0}
    choice = raw_input('Please pick an option:\n1) Update number of food I have\n2) Clear all\n>>')
    fruit = 0
    nextFruit = 'Apples'
    while True:
        if choice == str(1):
            fruit = int(raw_input('How many ' + str.lower(nextFruit) + ' do you want to add?\n>>'))
            if fruit == 0 and nextFruit == 'Apples':
                nextFruit = 'Bananas'
                continue
            elif fruit == 0 and nextFruit == 'Bananas':
                nextFruit = 'Grapes'
                continue
            elif fruit == 0 and nextFruit == 'Grapes':
                print 'Updating...'
                print  food
                choice = raw_input('Please pick an option:\n1) Update number of food I have\n2) Clear all\n>>')
            else:
                food[nextFruit] += fruit
        elif choice == str(2):
            food['Apples'] = 0
            food['Bananas'] = 0
            food['Grapes'] = 0
            print 'Updating...'
            print  food
            choice = raw_input('Please pick an option:\n1) Update number of food I have\n2) Clear all\n>>')
        else:
            print "You've entered a wrong number....try again please:"
            print
            choice = raw_input('Please pick an option:\n1) Update number of food I have\n2) Clear all\n>>')
share|improve this answer
  1. For updating in a loop, maybe try something like:

    for key in food:
        food[key] += int(raw_input('How many %s do you want to add?> ' % key) or 0)
    
  2. You are already clearing the dictionary by setting the values to zero.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help guys. I figured that the dictionary should be placed before the function. And as rkd91 answered, I have implemented a while loop with an if statement. Everything works perfect now. – Max Wayne Dec 19 '12 at 7:44

If I understand correctly - you want to keep asking this question repeatedly? In that case, all you need to do is put while True: and indent the block of code you want to repeat, and it will loop through that forever. You probably want to have it from the raw_input (just input in Python 3) to just after the elif - or, if you make food a global variable (so that it doesn't get re-initialised to 0 every time myStuff() is called), you can just do:

while True:
  myStuff()
share|improve this answer
    
Addendum: You have a return value of False for 'illegal' input. I'd use that return value as a condition for the while loop. – Moshe Dec 19 '12 at 0:11

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