Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a visual C++ project for a DLL and a setup project for it. In the installer i've added the content files of my project.

Is there a way to add a file as a content file depending on if you are compiling debug or release? I want to include boost_date_time-vc100-mt-gd-1_51.dll if I compile under debug and boost_date_time-vc100-mt-1_51.dll if I compile under release.

My additional deps looks like this

Shell32.lib;libzmq.lib;log4cxx.lib;boost_date_time-vc100-mt-gd-1_51.lib;...

Under additional library directories i've added the path to all these .lib files which also contains their respective .dll files

I've tried the following with no success...

  1. Added a Custom build step to run before build that copies the correct dll files to the OutDir and set the Output of this custom build step to be the dll files.

  2. Conditionally include a content file by manually editing the vcxproj file. If configuration was release mode I would set the non-debug version as deployment content and the debug version to false and vice versa for Debug mode. This looked something like this,

    <ItemGroup Condition="'$(Configuration)'=='Release'">

    <None Include="boost_date_time-vc100-mt-1_51.dll ">

    <DeploymentContent>true</DeploymentContent>....

    </None></ItemGroup

Neither of these worked however. The second option seemed to always default to debug mode no matter how I built my project.

share|improve this question
    
Are you linking the DLL with a LIB, or are you using LoadLibrary? –  paddy Dec 18 '12 at 22:46
    
I updated my question. I guess it wasn't really shorten the lib name. Im using a header but the function im calling requires the .dll so there is no lib involved –  Thatoneguy Dec 18 '12 at 23:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you add a dependency, you can add it to one configuration or all configurations:

enter image description here

[This picture is of VS 2012, but 2010 and 2008 look pretty much the same.]

So, you pick the configuration you want to modify at the top-left, then add the library to the additional dependencies. Note that what you add here will be the .lib file associated with a DLL, not the dll itself (the compiler will make the executable depend on the DLL because you link with its .lib file).

share|improve this answer
    
Tried this out. The setup project was not pulling in the dlls and the my project was not dumping the dlls to the output dir either. Thanks though. –  Thatoneguy Dec 19 '12 at 2:27
    
I take that back. Debug is adding all the required files to the setup project with your suggestion. Release is failing to pack the release version of the boost dll though but will pick up everything else. For some reason it won't pick that up. –  Thatoneguy Dec 19 '12 at 3:24
    
@Thatoneguy: If you selected "Release" and added the library, but it's not picking it up, I'm clean out of good ideas. –  Jerry Coffin Dec 19 '12 at 3:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.