Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have the following codes:

const int N=3;
static double * p[N];

Does p stands for a static pointer pointing to a N-dimensional double array, or a N-dimensional array with each elements standing for a static pointer?

Also I found the following change failed compilation, and not sure why...

int N=3;
static double * p[N];
share|improve this question
4  
Just a tip based on this and your previous question: You need to stop thinking of static as being part of the type. It's not. You work out the type of the thing ("array of N pointer to double" in this case) and then you can say it's static. Whatever that object is made up of will have static storage duration. If your type contains pointers, whatever they point to is not part of the object. They are different objects entirely and are not necessarily static. The declaration in your question doesn't create any doubles at all. It just creates some pointers. Those pointers are static. – Joseph Mansfield Dec 18 '12 at 23:13
    
@sftrabbit It's clearer to me now that "static" is not part of the type. E.g. "int * a, b;" declares "a" as a pointer, whereas "b" as an "int"; however, "int static a, b;" declare both "a" and "b" has a "static" duration. Am I right? – Hailiang Zhang Dec 18 '12 at 23:26
    
Well a is a "pointer to int" and b is just an "int". But yes, both a and b will be static in your second example. – Joseph Mansfield Dec 18 '12 at 23:29
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Does p stands for a static pointer pointing to a N-dimensional double array, or a N-dimensional array with each elements standing for a static pointer?

Almost the second choice a N-sized array with each elements standing for a static pointer. Note the change from "N-dimensional" to "N-sized". Thanks @David.

Also I found the following change failed compilation, and not sure why...

Arrays need constant integers for their size. After you remove the "constness" of N the size of p is uncertain at compile time.

share|improve this answer
    
@David My lecturers also sometimes use this ambiguous terminology. It confuses me too. – Joseph Mansfield Dec 18 '12 at 23:14
    
Oops @David, fixed it, thank you. – imreal Dec 18 '12 at 23:14
    
const-qualified objects are not compile-time constants, they are just objects that leads to undefined behavior if changed after their initialization. Those arrays are VLAs, both of them (compile with gcc -std=c89 -pedantic). In fact, arrays doesn't need constants for their size from C99 - through in C11 VLAs support is not mandatory. – effeffe Dec 18 '12 at 23:28
    
@effeffe, the question is also C++ tagged. There is no VLA on C++. – imreal Dec 18 '12 at 23:30
    
@Nick: you're right, forgot to mention that I was talking about the C situation. It's not really a "both C/C++" question, anyway. – effeffe Dec 18 '12 at 23:37

p is a static array of 3 pointers to doubles.

The compiler requires the size of the array to be known at compile time, which is why you can only use a const int and not an int for the array size declaration.

share|improve this answer
cdecl> explain static double *p[10];
declare p as static array 10 of pointer to double

There's also cdecl.org for getting that kind of help online.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.