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What’s the difference between String and string?

We have

1) string str = "Hello World"

2) String str = new String("Hello World")

What are the differences between these two ?

Thanks

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marked as duplicate by Chris Nielsen, Austin Salonen, Jehof, AlphaMale, Max MacLeod Dec 19 '12 at 11:46

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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It's possible the OP is also interested in the difference between assignment of a string constant, and assignment of a constructed string. –  hatchet Dec 18 '12 at 23:14
    
Constructors for String: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.string.string.aspx –  Brian Rasmussen Dec 18 '12 at 23:15
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

None. A good place to start on StackOverflow when you have a question is to search for it. :) I.e. "string vs. String"

What's the difference between String and string?

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my compiler disagrees that there is no difference. –  Servy Dec 18 '12 at 23:55
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Your first line is equal to this line because string is an alias for System.String;

System.String str = "Hello World";

But your second line doesn't compile because string.String() method doesn't have an overload which takes string parameter. When you write your second line, you are calling one of the string constructor.

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Your second one shouldn't compile as String has no overload that takes a string input. You may have seen an example which takes a char[] (char array) and that will simply convert that char array into a string (i.e. concatenate the chars into a single string object).

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The second example doesn't compile. Pretty big difference.

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+1, but: Though the VB counterpart does compile. –  igrimpe Dec 19 '12 at 8:12
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