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I've hit a problem that has me completely stumped. I'll illustrate with a code sample:

@interface Crasher ()
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSArray *array;
@end

@implementation Crasher

- (void)crash;
{
  NSMutableArray *mutable = [NSMutableArray array];
  NSArray *items = @[@0, @1, @2, @3];

  if ([@YES boolValue])
  {
    [items enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id obj, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
      [mutable addObject:obj];
    }];
  }
  else
  {
    [items enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id obj, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
      [mutable addObject:obj];
    }];
  }

  [self setArray:mutable];
}

@end

The above code crashes on the [self setArray:mutable] line when ARC is enabled and it is run on a device. The code never crashes on the simulator nor does it crash on a device with ARC disabled. Using NSZombieEnabled indicates that the setter is attempting to retain an already-deallocated array.

It does not crash if the second [mutable addObject:obj] call is commented out (but this code is never executed in the first place).

I've uploaded a project that demonstrates this crash to Github to aidansteele/arc-crash. I am using Xcode 4.5.2. It seems to not occur on Xcode 4.6, but that is still in developer preview. What am I doing wrong?


Addressing this answer (in the question so that I have a bit more space), I don't believe the problem lies within -[NSArray enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:] as the problem persists if I change that method call to use the following -[NSArray(Functional) each:] call.

@interface NSArray (Functional)
- (void)each:(void (^)(id obj))action;
@end

@implementation NSArray (Functional)

- (void)each:(void (^)(id))action;
{
  for (NSUInteger idx = 0; idx < [self count]; idx++)
  {
    action([self objectAtIndex:idx]);
  }
}

@end
share|improve this question
    
on which line does the crash happen? – sergio Dec 18 '12 at 23:33
    
It's probably a problem with the block. What happens if you use ARC, but do the enumeration on the foreground thread instead of on a background thread? You probably don't want to call setArray until after the enumeration is done. Right now it is happening almost immediately. I'll bet if you made the items array big enough it would crash in the simulator. – Mark Dec 18 '12 at 23:34
    
@sergio I've edited the question to clarify that it happens when setting the property. – Sedate Alien Dec 18 '12 at 23:40
1  
If you're seeing a difference in your code's behavior from Xcode 4.5.2 to 4.6, then you're likely to be looking at an Xcode bug. Please file it. – NSResponder Dec 18 '12 at 23:47
2  
Also works fine with NSMutableArray *mutable = [@[] mutableCopy]; or any other method that traditionally increased the retain count. – Valentin Radu Dec 19 '12 at 0:21

Because this problem only occurs on the device (ARM code), and in a Release build (optimised code) I very much suspect you have found a bug in the Clang compiler's optimiser with respect to ARC and blocks and autorelease. Raise a bug in Radar with your sample project as an attachment.

If you replace the enumerateObjectsUsingBlock with

for (id n in items)
{
   [mutable addObject:n];
}

you're crash will go away.

Other changes to the code that fix the problem:

Replace:

[NSMutableArray array];

with

[NSMutableArray new];

or

[[NSMutableArray alloc] init];

Also, as an aside, you shouldn't be storing an NSMutableArray in a NSArray property. You should be converting the NSMutableArray to an NSArray before assigning it to the property. Eg:

self.array = [NSArray arrayWithArray:mutable];

Note that this won't fix the crash. It is just better code.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree that this is a really good candidate for submitting a radar, especially since he already has a sample project. – Kendall Helmstetter Gelner Dec 19 '12 at 19:03
1  
[NSArray arrayWithArray:mutable] sounds like a very round-about way of saying [mutable copy]. Even better, the array property should be declared with copy semantics. – Sedate Alien Dec 19 '12 at 22:16
    
Also, it's submitted as radar #12905972 if anyone wishes to follow its progress. – Sedate Alien Dec 19 '12 at 22:23
    
If it's not occurring in Xcode 4.6, I wonder how much traction this radar will actually get. Apple is unlikely to go back and make changes to Xcode 4.5 at this point. – StilesCrisis Dec 20 '12 at 0:29
    
Can you please elaborate on why you feel [NSMutableArray new]; or [[NSMutableArray alloc] init]; is better than [NSMutableArray array];? Is this a personal preference, or is there a documented advantage? – Axeva Oct 19 '14 at 14:48

I think the answer may lie with the variable being auto-released, and the block making use of this auto-released variable.

From the Clang docs on storage duration of __autoreleasing objects:

A program is ill-formed if it declares an __autoreleasing object of non-automatic storage duration. A program is ill-formed if it captures an __autoreleasing object in a block or, unless by reference, in a C++11 lambda.

So how to test if this is the issue?

First we see if the block capturing the mutable array really is the source of the issue. Comment out the use of the mutable array in the first block (the only block called) and use NSLog on the value found by enumeration instead:

[items enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id obj, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
        //[mutable addObject:obj];
        NSLog(@"item is %@",obj);
    }];

That fixes the crash. What if we simply reference the mutable array in a way that does not cause mutation (to make sure that mutation is not an issue)?

[items enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id obj, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
        //[mutable addObject:obj];
        NSLog(@"Mutable array is %@",mutable);
    }];

That still crashes, so we can tell just referencing the autoreleased mutable array in the block is causing an issue. On a side note, you also get a crash using arrayWithCapacity correctly sized to hold all the values.

So how can we fix this issue, if the problem is a block capturing an autoreleased object?

We can make the variable strong instead, so that ARC has to release it:

   NSMutableArray *mutable = [NSMutableArray array];

That fixes the crash, and ARC properly releases the variable when the method is left.

However I am not wholly sure that is the full story - merely introducing this simple block anywhere in that method also fixes the crash:

  void (^useMute)();

    useMute = ^() {
        NSLog(@"Mutable is %@", mutable);
    };

Even if it is never used, it's causing the mutable array to be retained and preventing an early release also. So it seems like the true error is somewhere with the interaction of enumerateUsingBlock and the auto-release pool.

On more of a side note, what also fixes the issue is to use normal enumeration instead of block enumeration:

   for (id obj in items )
      {
          [mutable addObject:obj];
      }

Sometimes it's better to use the simpler mechanisms to do things unless you have a great reason for using the fancier methods. For a loop over array elements that is intended to be straight-forward synchronous code execution, why use a block if you don't need access to the other parameters the block passes you? You even have more control using the C constructs continue and stop than the block loop, which only allows for stopping the enumeration entirely.

share|improve this answer
    
I should note that I was only using -[NSArray enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:] for illustrative purposes. This problem is occurring in a much larger project, but I reduced it here to the minimal example that reproduces the issue. My apologies for not making this clear in the question and leading you on a wild goose chase! – Sedate Alien Dec 19 '12 at 22:22
    
It's also worth noting that commenting out usage of mutable in the second block (i.e. the one that is never called) also causes this crash to go away. – Sedate Alien Dec 19 '12 at 22:26
    
I figured it was a problem in a larger project, but it seemed like the advice on a fix could be taken back to help whatever the real problem was... very interesting that commenting out the code not called causes any kind of issue. Definitely file a radar. – Kendall Helmstetter Gelner Dec 20 '12 at 1:39

I think there's an issue in the enumerateObjectsUsingBlock method for your version of SDK. Maybe you should read the release notes of the new SDK or known issues of the old one to find out more. So, what happens is, your retain count is just fine up to the point when you call enumerateObjectsUsingBlock. After that method exits, your pointer points to some garbage.

One way to fix it would be to take responsibility for your collection and promise you will not dispose of it before enumerateObjectsUsingBlock exits. Although a fix, it doesn't tackle the core problem, which as I said above, I think it resides in enumerateObjectsUsingBlock. Here is a code that works(around).

#import "Crasher.h"

@interface Crasher ()
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSArray *array;
@end

@implementation Crasher

- (void)crash;
{
  __block NSMutableArray *mutable = [NSMutableArray array];
  NSArray *items = @[@0, @1, @2, @3];

  if ([@YES boolValue])
  {
    [items enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id obj, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
      [mutable addObject:obj];
    }];
  }
  else
  {
    [items enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id obj, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
      [mutable addObject:obj];
    }];
  }

    NSLog(@"%@", mutable);

  [self setArray:mutable];
}

@end
share|improve this answer
    
I responded to your answer in the question body. This comment space doesn't really provide enough room for a nicely-formatted answer. :) – Sedate Alien Dec 19 '12 at 1:04
    
I see, then it must have something to do with blocks in general. try to create a new project, from a template, without modifing any settings and see if the same code causes the same problems. – Valentin Radu Dec 19 '12 at 1:15
    
one thing is sure, as soon as you use a block in your code, the retain count breaks. The workaround I propose still stands, but since it appears to be bigger than expected, you should find the root problem. – Valentin Radu Dec 19 '12 at 1:17
    
The sample project mentioned in the question body is indeed a fresh project that has nothing but this code added. It still has the same issue, unfortunately. – Sedate Alien Dec 19 '12 at 1:52

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