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I'm trying to make a C++ class resembling std::ostream, that will take its input and write to two std::ostreams given in the constructor. Here it is together with appropriate operator<< template:

struct SplitStream
{
    SplitStream(std::ostream & a_, std::ostream & b_) : a(a_), b(b_) {}
    std::ostream & a, & b;
};


template<class T>
const SplitStream & operator << (const SplitStream & sp, const T & x)
{
    sp.a << x;
    sp.b << x;
    return sp;
}

Several lines below that code, I try to use this class:

void foo(SplitStream & out)
{
    double some_double = 1.23;
    out << "bar" << some_double << std::endl;
}

And I get this rather enigmatic error:

... error C2678: binary '<<' : no operator found which takes a left-hand operand of type 'const SplitStream' (or there is no acceptable conversion) ...

What am I doing wrong? I tried to define operator<< without consts, and it didn't compile either.

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The immediate problem is that std::endl isn't an object but a function template declared something like this:

template <typename cT, typename Traits>
std::basic_ostream<cT, Traits>& endl(std::basic_ostream<cT, Traits>&);

To use a function pointer like this, the template arguments need to be deduced. To this end, the class std::basic_ostream<cT, Traits> declared suitable overloads for operator<<():

template <typename cT, typename Traits>
std::basic_ostream<cT, Traits>& std::baisic_ostream<cT, Traits>::operator<< (
    std::basic_ostream<cT, Traits>& (*manip)(std::basic_ostream<cT, Traits>&));

This way, the compiler can deduce the correct instantiation when the std::endl function is referenced.

However, all that is utterly irrelevant because what you are trying to do is better done entirely differently! You should create a suitable stream buffer and use a reasonably constructed std::ostream with this custom stream buffer. Below is a complete example how to do it properly (I had posted it before but only a couple dozens times...):

#include <streambuf>

struct teebuf
    : std::streambuf
{
    std::streambuf* sb1_;
    std::streambuf* sb2_;

    teebuf(std::streambuf* sb1, std::streambuf* sb2)
        : sb1_(sb1), sb2_(sb2) {
    }
    int overflow(int c) {
        typedef std::streambuf::traits_type traits;
        bool rc(true);
        if (!traits::eq_int_type(traits::eof(), c)) {
            traits::eq_int_type(this->sb1_->sputc(c), traits::eof())
                && (rc = false);
            traits::eq_int_type(this->sb2_->sputc(c), traits::eof())
                && (rc = false);
        }
        return rc? traits::not_eof(c): traits::eof();
    }
    int sync() {
        bool rc(true);
        this->sb1_->pubsync() != -1 || (rc = false);
        this->sb2_->pubsync() != -1 || (rc = false);
        return rc? 0: -1;
    }
};

#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::ofstream fout("tee.txt");
    teebuf        sbuf(fout.rdbuf(), std::cout.rdbuf());
    std::ostream  out(&sbuf);
    out << "hello, world!\n";
}
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The other answer is better, but for completeness:

The SplitStream references in your operator<< should not be const, since they are modifying the streams that the struct contains.

template<class T>
SplitStream & operator << (SplitStream & sp, const T & x)
{
    sp.a << x;
    sp.b << x;
    return sp;
}
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As I mentioned in my question, this code does not compile, and sp can be const: it contains references to streams as members, not the streams themselves. –  KCH Dec 19 '12 at 14:06
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