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I am trying to make code that will retrieve courses, instructors and times from the input of a course number (CS101)

It should tell you the room number, instructor and time of the class after you type in the correct course number.

This is what I have so far.

def main():
    courses, instructors, times = create_info()

    print('Please enter a course number...')
    choice = input(': ').upper()

    if choice == 'CS101':
        courses.get(CS101)
        instructors.get(CS101)
        times.get(CS101)
    elif choice == 'CS102':
        print()
    elif choice == 'CS103':
        print()
    elif choice == 'NT110':
        print()
    elif choice == 'CM241':
        print()
    else:
        print('Sorry, invalid course number')
        print()
        main()

    print()
    main()



def create_info():
    courses = {'CS101':'3004', 'CS102':'4501', 'CS103':'6755', 'NT110':'1244',
               'CM241':'1411'}
    instructors = {'CS101':'Haynes', 'CS102':'Alvarado', 'CS103':'Rich',
                   'NT110':'Burke', 'CM241':'Lee'}
    times = {'CS101':'8:00 a.m.', 'CS102':'9:00 a.m.', 'CS103':'10:00 a.m.',
             'NT110':'11:00 a.m.', 'CM241':'1:00 p.m.'}

    return courses, instructors, times

main()

It gives the following:

NameError: global name 'CS101' is not defined

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is with these lines:

    courses.get(CS101)
    instructors.get(CS101)
    times.get(CS101)

CS101 is assumed to be a variable, and not a string or a dictionary key.

it should be something like this:

print(courses.get('CS101'))

or

print(courses['CS101'])

The key needs to be enclosed in single or double quotes to indicate it's a string, and not a variable.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, it worked fine while replacing courses.get(CS101) with print(courses['CS101']) – Megatoaster Dec 19 '12 at 0:16
    
Thanks for explaining that, it would not let me enter CS101 into the dictionary, as it was a string, I should have known that you would put single quotes in the retrieving area. Thank you for explaining it so that I won't have this problem again. – Megatoaster Dec 19 '12 at 0:19
    
While this answer does diagnose the cause of the exception correctly, I think the solution is clearly suboptimal. A better approach is to access the dictionaries directly with choice as the key. That way you don't need the big if/elif block (and the main function doesn't need to know what the full set of courses is). – Blckknght Dec 19 '12 at 0:37

One nice thing about using dictionaries is that you can quickly check if a key is in them using the in operator. So you could replace your big if/elif/else block with the following:

if choice in courses:
    # do the output with choice as a key to the dictionaries
    print("Course Number:", courses[choice])
    print("Instructor:", instructors[choice])
    print("Times:", times[choice])
else: 
    # choice is not a valid key to the dictionaries
    print("Sorry, invalid course number")

This style of coding is known in the Python world as "Look Before You Leap" (LBYL) because you check that the operations you're about to do (looking up the chosen class in the dictionaries) is valid before doing them. An alternative style (which is a bit more advanced), is known as "Easier to Ask Forgiveness than Permission" (EAFP), where you use try and except clauses to handle Exceptions that get generated in some unusual situations. Here's how you could do the code above in a EAFP style:

try:
    # try do the output unconditionally
    print("Course Number:", courses[choice])
    print("Instructor:", instructors[choice])
    print("Times:", times[choice])
except KeyError:
    # a KeyError is raised if choice isn't in the dictionaries
    print("Sorry, invalid course number")

In this case there's not much difference between the two approaches, but in some situations (if checking the situation is valid takes lots of time), EAFP may be faster since the operation that may fail is already doing a check for the invalid situation (so it can raise an appropriate exception).

share|improve this answer
1  
Also, it's probably more pythonic to do a while 1: loop than to call main() at the end of every main(), but I wasn't trying to rewrite the whole thing. – jgritty Dec 19 '12 at 0:43
    
@jgritty Yeah, I thought about mentioning that too. – Blckknght Dec 19 '12 at 0:45

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