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I want to be able to create a compare function using a class, eg:

bool someClassLess(const someClass &a1, const someClass &a2) {
    return (a1.variable1 < a2.variable1 && a1.variable2 < a2.variable2);
}

Then declare a priority queue of someClass and pass my compare function to be used when pushing elements, eg:

PriorityQueue<someClass> arr(someClassLess());

If no compare function is passed when declaring the priority queue, it should automatically use the less function in functional library when pushing.

How do I pass a compare function to a class?

Below you can find code of my selfwritten PriorityQueue. The code includes a failed attempt to pass a compare function.

#ifndef PRIORITY_QUEUE_H
#define PRIORITY_QUEUE_H

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

using std::cout;
using std::endl;
using std::less;

template<typename T>
class PriorityQueue {
public:

    template<typename PRED>
    PriorityQueue(PRED compare);
    ~PriorityQueue();

    T pop();
    void push(const T &e);
    size_t getSize() const;
    bool isEmpty() const;
    void print() const;

private:

    T *end;
    T *queue;
    PRED compare;

};

template<typename T>
PriorityQueue<T>::PriorityQueue(PRED compare = less<T>()) : queue(0), end(0), compare(compare) {
}


template<typename T>
PriorityQueue<T>::~PriorityQueue() {
    delete [] queue;
}

template<typename T>
T PriorityQueue<T>::pop() {
    if(isEmpty()) {
        throw "Queue is empty";
    } else if(getSize() == 1) {
        T removed = *queue;
        delete [] queue;
        queue = end = 0;
        return removed;
    }

    T *newQueue = new T[getSize() - 1];
    // Iteratorer
    T *it = queue, *itNew = newQueue;

    T removed = *(it++);
    for( ; it != end; it++, itNew++) {
        *itNew = *it;
    }

    int oldSize = getSize();

    T *tmp = queue;
    queue = newQueue;
    delete [] tmp;

    end = queue + oldSize - 1;

    return removed;
}

template<typename T>
void PriorityQueue<T>::push(const T &e) {
    if (isEmpty()) {
        queue = new T[1];
        *queue = e;
        end = queue + 1;
        return;
    }

    T *newQueue = new T[getSize() + 1];
    // Iterators
    T *it = queue, *itNew = newQueue;

    // Find where element e should be inserted, whilst inserting elements
    // compare(*it, e) used to look like *it < e when I was initially creating the class
    for( ; compare(*it, e) && it != end; it++, itNew++) {
        *itNew = *it; 
    }

    // Insert e
    *(itNew++) = e;

    // Insert the remaining elements
    for ( ; it != end; it++, itNew++) {
        *itNew = *it;
    }

    int oldSize = getSize();

    T *tmp = queue;
    queue = newQueue;
    delete [] tmp;

    end = queue + oldSize + 1;
}

template<typename T>
size_t PriorityQueue<T>::getSize() const {
    return (end - queue);
}

template<typename T>
bool PriorityQueue<T>::isEmpty() const {
    return (getSize() <= 0);
}

template<typename T>
void PriorityQueue<T>::print() const {
    for(int *i = queue; i != end; i++) {
        cout << *i << endl;
    }
}

#endif
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Niet the Dark Absol, WhozCraig, Emil Vikström, dystroy, Julien Poulin Dec 19 '12 at 9:50

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Am I the only one who can't find an actual question? I see what the overall goal is and what you've tried, but no problem stated. –  chris Dec 19 '12 at 0:26
2  
Why is option 1 ugly? If you make one change, so it looks like template<typename T, typename Compare=std::less<T> > class PriorityQueue then you can just say PriorityQueue<int> and it will use std::less<int> by default, but you can also say PriorityQueue<int, MyCompare> if you want. That's how the built-in ordered collections work (e.g. std::map) –  Kevin Ballard Dec 19 '12 at 0:30
    
@chris I realise I don't have a question. I'll update the text accordingly. –  Niklas Ekman Dec 19 '12 at 0:55
    
I know you've 'solved' it at this point, but I wanted to chime in to say that Option 2 is not just ugly - it's dangerous. The compare function is integral to the priority queue. Option 2 opens for the possibility of passing different comparators each time you push - that could violate the integrity of your priority queue. –  Alex Goldberg Dec 19 '12 at 1:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why not just shamelessly copy the implementation of std::priority_queue. Just use this:

template <typename T, typename Compare = std::less< T > >
class PriorityQueue {
  public:
    PriorityQueue(Compare comp = Compare()) : end(0), queue(0), compare(comp) { };

    // ...

  private:

    T *end;
    T *queue;
    Compare compare;

};
share|improve this answer
    
Looking at the standard library... so simple, yet so smart! Thanks, this worked fine! –  Niklas Ekman Dec 19 '12 at 0:55
1  
Some people call this design reuse. I call it smart. –  brian beuning Dec 19 '12 at 1:52

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