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I'm getting duplicates when I do two LEFT JOINs to get to the "event_name" in my example below. I get 112 cases with it set up this way. However, if I get rid of the 2 LEFT JOIN lines and run the query, I get the proper 100 records without duplicates. I tried DISTINCT with the code below, but I still get 112 with duplicates.

SELECT "cases"."id", "cases"."date", "cases"."name", "event"."event_name" 
FROM "cases"
LEFT JOIN "middle_table" ON "cases"."serial" = "middle_table"."m_serial"
LEFT JOIN "event" ON "middle_table"."e_serial" = "event"."ev_serial"
WHERE "cases"."date" BETWEEN '2012-12-11' AND '2012-12-13'

How can I specify that I only want the exact 100 cases from "cases", and that I don't want anything from the tables in the joins to produce any more rows?

Thanks!

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1  
How are tables related? 1:N from cases to middle_table? Could you tell us a bit about that? –  user1231958 Dec 19 '12 at 0:44
    
could you provide some testdata? sql-fiddle is great for this. –  Nico Dec 19 '12 at 0:49
    
In my case, I was getting duplicates due to joining with a one-to-many join. The only solution that I could find was to use sub-queries. A has many Bs. B has many Cs and many Ds. D has many Es and many Fs. I needed to fetch all Bs (that match a search string), while also aggregating all related Cs, Es, and Fs for each match. I used an outer join to get ABC, then used two sub-queries to aggregate DE and DF. –  bambams Oct 3 '13 at 16:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to extend your ON clauses to include a condition so that for each entry in cases there is only one entry in middle_table that matches the condition and that for each entry in middle_table there is only one entry in event:

LEFT JOIN middle_table ON cases.serial = middle_table.m_serial AND some_condition

You can of course use DISTINCT. If that doesn't work it means that your results are all different in the fields cases.id, cases.date, cases.name and event.event_name. Examine the results and decide which of the entries you want to throw away and include that condition in your ON clause.

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Hi AndreKR, so like I mentioned on JohnLBevan's post below: I don't care which child I drop since they are identical. Would you be able to give a theoretical condition? I just now understand that the Max function means "returns the largest value of the selected column". Is there a simple way of just using that on an id field in one or both of the joined tables? –  Chain Dec 19 '12 at 1:01
    
To do that you need to use one of these three techniques: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/… But if they were really identical, DISTINCT would have filtered them away. –  AndreKR Dec 19 '12 at 1:03
    
Note that above link is specific for MySQL but probably works with other systems, too. You should always state which DBMS you're using in your question anyway. –  AndreKR Dec 19 '12 at 1:06
    
Thank you: it's MSSQL –  Chain Dec 19 '12 at 1:08
    
Looks like I'll need to do more digging to find out why DISTINCT isn't working then. –  Chain Dec 19 '12 at 1:09

The issue is you have multiple matches in the tables you're left joining with. Effectively your code says:

select *
from parent
left outer join child on parent.id = child.parentId

If a parent has two children, you get both; so the parent appears twice.

If you want to only get the parent once you need to compromise; you can't have both children. Either perform an aggregate function on columns from the child table and do a group by on columns from the parent table, or use rownumber() over partition by (list,of,parent,columns order by list,of,child,columns) r in an inner statement and where r=1 in an outer statement, such as below:

select p.id, p.name, max(c.id), max(c.name) --nb: child id and name may come from different records
from parent p
left outer join child c on parent.id = child.parentId
group by p.id, p.name

or

select *
from 
(
    select p.id, p.name, c.id, c.name
    , rownumber() over (partition by p.id order by c.id desc) r
    from parent p
    left outer join child c on parent.id = child.parentId
) x
where x.r = 1

UPDATE

As mentioned in the comments, if the child data is exactly the same you can do this:

select p.id, p.name, c.name
from parent p
left outer join 
(
    select distinct c.parentId, c.name
    from child
) c on parent.id = child.parentId

or (if a few fields are different but you don't care which you get)

select p.id, p.name, c.id, c.name
from parent p
left outer join 
(
    select max(c.id) id, c.parentId, c.name
    from child
    group by c.parentId, c.name
) c on parent.id = child.parentId
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ps. @AndreKR also makes a good suggestion; i.e. add conditional logic to the join to limit the results to a max of one child per parent. –  JohnLBevan Dec 19 '12 at 0:56
    
Hi, I think I understand most of that. Yes: in my case, some of the parents have multiple children...but it's some kind of redundancy in the hospitals middle table or event table. Basically, both children of certain parents are exact duplicates: so I don't care which child I pick, because they are both the same. –  Chain Dec 19 '12 at 0:57
    
In that case either of the above is good (second method is probably more efficient). Alternatively you can filter out the duplicate children early on (though I suspect if a distinct statement isn't working, there are some differences in what's being returned at the child level, even if it's just the ids). –  JohnLBevan Dec 19 '12 at 1:18
SELECT "cases"."id", "cases"."date", "cases"."name", "event"."event_name" 
FROM "cases"
LEFT JOIN "middle_table" ON "cases"."serial" = "middle_table"."m_serial"
LEFT JOIN "event" ON "middle_table"."e_serial" = "event"."ev_serial"
GROUP BY  "cases"."id", "cases"."date", "cases"."name", "event"."event_name" 
WHERE "cases"."date" BETWEEN '2012-12-11' AND '2012-12-13'
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