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I'm trying to create a circular plot with vectors of various magnitudes coming from the origin at various angles: something like the image below, although it doesn't have to be identical. I've pored over circular and circstats and learned a lot about circular graphs, but not found anything quite like what I'm looking for. I think I could crib something by hand if I had to but it just seems likely that someone more experienced than me has already written some code to do this.

Any suggestions would be most welcome!

Schmidt, 2007, Ecology 88(11):2793-2802, Figure 2C


This figure is from Schmidt, 2007, Ecology 88(11):2793-2802, Figure 2C.

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! I think it might involve arrows.circular! Update to follow! –  fredtal Dec 19 '12 at 1:20
    
4  
Do you have some example data to work with? That would likely speed up reponses. As a side note, you may be able to do so easily with ggplot2, coord_polar and stat_spoke. –  sebastian-c Dec 19 '12 at 1:37
    
@TaliaYoung I add a new version to the plot party. –  agstudy Dec 20 '12 at 5:59
    
Thank you so much for all the suggestions! I'm so grateful! –  fredtal Jan 7 '13 at 21:53

4 Answers 4

The plotrix package hal a polar.plotfunction that seems to do what you want. I haven't yet figured out how you would add a dashed line along an arc of one of the edges, however.

Example:

library(plotrix)

testlen<-c(rnorm(36)*2+5)
testpos<-seq(0,350,by=10)
polar.plot(testlen,testpos,main="Test Polar Plot",lwd=3,line.col=4)

#rotate degree
oldpar<-polar.plot(testlen,testpos,main="Test Clockwise Polar Plot",
start=180,clockwise=TRUE,lwd=3,line.col=4)

# reset everything
par(oldpar)

enter image description here

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The grid package is very powerful for combining and arranging graphical elements.

library(grid)

Here the result: enter image description here Some data , I suppose for the rest taht your values < 1

polar <- read.table(text ='
degree value
1    120  0.50
2     30  0.20
3   160  0.20
4     35  0.50
5    150  0.40
6    90  0.14
7    70  0.50
8      20  0.60',header=T)


## function to create axis label
axis.text <- function(col,row,text,angle){
  pushViewport(viewport(layout.pos.col=col,layout.pos.row=row,just=c('top')))
  grid.text(angle,vjust=0) 
  grid.text(text,vjust=2)         
  popViewport()
}

## function to create the arrows, Here I use the data
arrow.custom <- function(polar){
  pushViewport(viewport(layout.pos.col=2,layout.pos.row=2))
  apply(polar,1,function(x){
       pushViewport(viewport(angle=x['degree']))  
          grid.segments(x0=0.5,y0=0.5,x1=0.5+x['value']*0.8,y1=0.5,
          arrow=arrow(type='closed'),gp=gpar(fill='grey'))
       popViewport()
  })
  popViewport()
}


## The global layout 3*3 matrix
lyt=grid.layout(3, 3, 
                   widths= unit(c(4,15,4), "lines"),
                   heights=unit(c(4,15,4), "lines"),
                   just='center')
pushViewport(viewport(layout=lyt,xscale=2*extendrange(polar$value)))
 ## the central part : circles , arrows and axes
pushViewport(viewport(layout.pos.col=2,layout.pos.row=2))
grid.circle(r=c(0.5,0.3),gp = gpar(ltw=c(3,2),col=c('black','grey')))
arrow.custom(polar)
grid.segments(x0=0.5,y0=0,x1=0.5,y=1,gp=gpar(col='grey'))
grid.segments(x0=0,y0=0.5,x1=1,y=0.5,gp=gpar(col='grey'))
popViewport()

## the axis labels 
axis.text(1,2,'Phragmites',expression(270 * degree))
axis.text(3,2,'Spartina',expression(90 * degree))
axis.text(2,1,'Increasing tropic position',expression(0 * degree))
axis.text(2,3,'Decreasing tropic position',expression(180 * degree))
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Here is an approach using my.symbols along with ms.polygon and ms.arrows from the TeachingDemos package:

plot(c(-2,2),c(-2,2), axes=FALSE, xlab='', ylab='', type='n', asp=1)
abline(v=0, col='lightgrey')
abline(h=0, col='lightgrey')
my.symbols(c(0,0),c(0,0),ms.polygon, xsize=c(2,4), lwd=c(1,2), n=360)

theta <- seq(pi/4, 3*pi/4, length=250)
lines( 2.03*cos(theta), 2.03*sin(theta), lwd=2, lty='dashed' )
lines( c(0,0), c(0,2), lty='dashed', lwd=2 )

a <- c(300,305,355,0,5,45,65)
l <- c(1.1, .5, .4,1,.6,.7,1.25)

my.symbols( rep(0,7), rep(0,7), ms.arrows, xsize=2, r=l, adj=0, 
        angle=pi/2 - pi/180*a )
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I ended up going with radial.plot in plotrix (although it turns out polar.plot has all the same features - it just wasn't as well documented when I was figuring it out). I couldn't figure out how to do arrows, or the partial dashed line along the circumference but neither are critical for my purposes. For some reason, I couldn't get the first data point to plot, so I inserted a dummy point. Thank you all for your help!

library(plotrix)

magnitude <- c(2.1, 2.3, 2.5, 1.5, 2.8, 2.7)
angle <- c(2.1, 2.6, -0.1, -2.6, 0.1, 0.4)
directionlabels <- c("more\nbenthic", "higher trophic", 
                     "more\npelagic", "lower trophic")
colors <- c("black", "red", "green", "blue", "orange", "purple", "pink")
par(cex.axis=0.7)
par(cex.lab=0.5)

radial.plot(c(0, magnitude), 
            c(0, angle), 
            lwd=4, line.col=,
            labels=directionlabels,
            radial.lim = c(0,3), #range of grid circle
            main="circular diagram!",
            show.grid.label=1, #put the concentric circle labels going down
            show.radial.grid=TRUE
)

circular diagram!

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