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I found here topic that answer a half of what am looking for: Does Scripting.Dictionary's RemoveAll() method release all of its elements first?

In my case values are instances of a Dictionary, so I have nested hierarchy of Dictionary objects.

My question is whether I need to call RemoveAll on each sub-dictionary?

' just for illustration
Dim d As Dictionary
Set d = New Dictionary

Set d("a") = New Dictionary
Set d("b") = New Dictionary

' Are the next section of code necessary?
' -------------------- section start
Dim key As Variant
For Each key In d
    d.Item(key).RemoveAll
Next
' -------------------- section end

d.RemoveAll
Set d = Nothing
share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by necessary? What are you trying to accomplish? –  Daniel Cook Dec 19 '12 at 2:58
    
I want to free all objects, and as I read (in the topic above), RemoveAll set all objects inside to Nothing, excellent, but am not sure if that function is recursive. –  Panayot Karabakalov Dec 19 '12 at 6:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In VB6 all objects (via COM) are subject to reference counting and so, unless there is a cycle, you should not need to manually cater for disposal.

share|improve this answer

Consider this code

Option Explicit

Private m_cCache As Collection

Private Sub Form_Load()
    ' just for illustration
    Dim d As Dictionary
    Set d = New Dictionary

    Set d("a") = New Dictionary
    Set d("b") = New Dictionary

    d("b").Add "c", 123
    SomeMethod d

    ' Are the next section of code necessary?
    ' -------------------- section start
    Dim key As Variant
    For Each key In d
        d.Item(key).RemoveAll
    Next
    ' -------------------- section end

    d.RemoveAll             '--- d("b") survives
    Set d = Nothing         '--- d survives

    Debug.Print "main="; m_cCache("main").Count, "child="; m_cCache("child").Count
End Sub

Private Sub SomeMethod(d As Dictionary)
    Set m_cCache = New Collection

    m_cCache.Add d, "main"
    m_cCache.Add d("b"), "child"
End Sub

Without cleanup section d("b") will be virtually untouched -- neither children removed, nor instance terminated.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. What you cover here is about clean up of multiple referencing, something that I know, hmm... in my case there no additional references to any of my Dictionary objects, but looking from this point, maybe you try to move me to an conclusion that I should call RemoveAll on d("a") and d("b") before d.RemoveAll, i.e. I need to inlude my code section? –  Panayot Karabakalov Dec 19 '12 at 19:10
    
It depends on the kind references you store in your Dictionarys. If you have something like d("a").Add "main", d this brings a circular reference that cannot be released without RemoveAll call at all. If your cleanup section is a generic function better make it use RemoveAll explicitly and trade performance for safety. –  wqw Dec 20 '12 at 8:10
    
That's true, thanks for this suggestion. –  Panayot Karabakalov Dec 20 '12 at 21:59

Ok, I think I can answer myself with the next test I made.

Sub Main()
  Dim d As Dictionary
  Dim i, j As Integer
  Dim sDummy As String * 10000
  For i = 1 To 1000
    Set d = New Dictionary      ' root dict.
    Set d("a") = New Dictionary ' child dict.
    For j = 1 To 1000
      d("a").Add j, sDummy
    Next j
    'd("a").RemoveAll
    d.RemoveAll
    Set d = Nothing
  Next i
End Sub

I comment out d("a").RemoveAll (my child dictionary) and there no any memory leaks. That mean that calling RemoveAll on the root (d) is quite enough, and this is all that I needs to know.

share|improve this answer
    
I can't see any reason why you even need to call RemoveAll on the root level Dictionary. Releasing the last reference to it should do this by itself. –  Bob77 Dec 20 '12 at 0:14
    
Yes, you're rigth, thanks. –  Panayot Karabakalov Dec 20 '12 at 4:26
    
BTW I haven't fixed it in your code, but in VB6 Dim i, j As Integer means Dim i As Object, j As Integer. –  Mark Hurd Dec 30 '12 at 7:03
    
@MarkHurd - Thanks for the tip about Dim i, j As Integer. As I'm new to VB6 I thought that both variables are Integers. Thanks again! –  Panayot Karabakalov Dec 30 '12 at 12:26
    
That's one of the changes in VB.NET that no-one complains about... –  Mark Hurd Dec 30 '12 at 12:56

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