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Regarding PHP functions, if you do not need a function to return a BOOLEAN or STRING, is there a difference between declaring a return on failure of a condition, rather than just letting the function automatically return?

For example,

Is there any internal difference between:

function check() {
    if( 5 > $v ) {
        die('yes');
    }
}

function check() {
    if( 5 > $v ) {
        die('yes');
    }
    else {
        return;
    }
}

Obviously, they appear to do the same exact thing on failure of the 'IF' condition, but internally, is one better than the other in for sake of memory, security, usability, or overall best practice?

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4 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

There is no effective, real-world difference in these statements in terms of memory or security. None, nada, zip, zero. They are completely identical. The few bytes needed to hold the additional opcodes is irrelevant, and if you care about the time spent parsing, tokenizing and interpreting the opcodes, you are engaging in micro-optimization.

In terms of "usability", the former is more clear by far. Returning from the else is silly. If I saw that in live code, I'd assume that whoever wrote it was distracted when doing so and clean it up.

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There might be a cost of processing return token to RET instruction, as opposed to it being automatically called. This however, is irrelevant to how you'd write your PHP. :) –  alex Dec 19 '12 at 2:32
    
Anyone that cares about optimizing away PHP opcodes is barking up the wrong tree unless they're out of things to optimize away. –  Charles Dec 19 '12 at 2:33
1  
How you can you affirmatively say there is absolutely no difference between the two. pre-processing time is increased, another logic branch is added. I'm not 100% sure of how PHP optimizes it's code, but it still has to parse it. –  Brad Christie Dec 19 '12 at 2:33
    
At what point would you be able to measure the performance difference? 10,000 repetitions? 100k? When would it actually make a difference? A million? Ten? We're talking about a pedantic micro-optimization here. –  Charles Dec 19 '12 at 2:35
    
@Charles: we're also talking about very vanilla examples here (or so I'm understanding them to be). I'm not trying to start a debate, I'm just curious how you classify the two as identical. –  Brad Christie Dec 19 '12 at 2:38
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return in your second example does nothing instead of increasing parser and compiler work, confusing thee reader what it's rule is, add unnecessary lines to code and increasing the app size in total, and in the end it doesn't have any kind of value!

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I prefer the first one. It is less lines of assembly, thus marginally more efficient (in binary size NOT speed). All functions define a return address when the function is done regardless of what is in the function, so adding an additional return just causes it to add an extra instruction.

I find it more readable and more common as well.

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I would argue the former easier to read and the latter just adds more overhead to the pre-processor (and bloat to file size). However it also makes it clear that the function does not return anything specific (though function name or comments could do this easier than a logic branch for just this purpose.

I realize and appreciate these are examples, but I would stick to brief but concise.

[/IMHO]

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