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var dml = 30
var dd = parseFloat(document.getElementById("DriverD").value)     <----- Only numbers like 10
var dm = dd-dml

alert((dd - dml) * 0.75)    <----- This works
alert(dm * 0.75)            <----- This returns NaN
alert(typeof(dm))        <----- This show that dm is a Number

I'm not sure why I keep getting NaN. I already tried parseFloat and parseInt but still showing NaN when multiplying a variable (dm) which consists of variables (dd-dml). dm is the result of subtracting dml with dd or 10-30. Please share your solutions.

I'm new here and I need help, please don't troll :) I am trying to add a cost calculator to my website.

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1  
typeof NaN is also "number", could you alert(dm) instead of the last? –  Bergi Dec 19 '12 at 3:58
2  
Works for me: jsfiddle.net/HfCrD –  Tim Medora Dec 19 '12 at 4:00
6  
What is the real value of DriverD element –  shiplu.mokadd.im Dec 19 '12 at 4:01
    
DriverD is a textbox and I am using 10 during troubleshooting of this issue. My website is a simple html/javascript site. –  Jay Dec 19 '12 at 4:09
    
@user1914656 Can you re-create the problem on JSFiddle or link to a live version we can see? –  Phil Dec 19 '12 at 4:24

3 Answers 3

It seems fine to me.

I want to tell another possible problem: You dont check if document.getElementById("DriverD").value is a number or not. If a user enters a string or other type, it will cause a problem.

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Thanks for your quick response. I will put error handler for that in the future :) but for now I am using the number 10 while troubleshooting this matter. –  Jay Dec 19 '12 at 4:10
    
I wish I could help. But haven't used javascript. –  silbunu Dec 19 '12 at 4:13
    
I GOT IT! HOW STUPID OF ME. ON MY ACTUAL WEBSITE I DECLARED DM FIRST BEFORE DD AND DML. WORKS FINE NOW THANKS GUYS! :D –  Jay Dec 19 '12 at 4:45

Try this

Two operands must be convert to parseFloat

<input type="text:" value="10" id="DriverD" />

var dml = parseFloat(30);
var dd = parseFloat(document.getElementById("DriverD").value);
var dm = dd-dml;
alert(dm * .10);

Result is -.2

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Sorry, still getting NaN when doing alert(dm * .10) :( it does not return NaN when doing alert((dd-dml)*.10) though –  Jay Dec 19 '12 at 4:16
    
I tried in this and got the correct ans. jsfiddle.net/LChFk –  Asish AP Dec 19 '12 at 4:20
    
Pls reload your browser(ctrl+shft+R) –  Asish AP Dec 19 '12 at 4:20
    
I GOT IT! HOW STUPID OF ME. ON MY ACTUAL WEBSITE I DECLARED DM FIRST BEFORE DD AND DML. WORKS FINE NOW THANKS GUYS! :D –  Jay Dec 19 '12 at 4:46

The only reason you could get NaN here is that the value of dd is NaN. Because the value of dm is defined as dd - dml and the value of dml is a Number value, 30.

parseFloat() always returns a Number value. The - operator converts its operands to Number only if necessary. So the value of dm must by definition be a Number value.

However, NaN is a Number value (typeof NaN === "number"), and it is "toxic": once an operand is NaN, the result of all following arithmetic operations is NaN.

That means that parseFloat() must have returned NaN, which means that the argument to parseFloat() could not be interpreted as the prefix of a decimal number representation.

One common reason for that is that the user has typed thousands separators (which are not supported) or a decimal comma while only a decimal point is supported.

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My bad is that I declared dm first (var dm = dd - dml) before declaring dd and dml so it's like doing var dm = null - null. It works fine now, I rearranged the order of my declarations.:) –  Jay Dec 19 '12 at 5:43
    
In that case it is equivalent to var dm = undefined - undefined where the right-hand side is equivalent to Number(undefined) - Number(undefined), NaN - NaN and finally NaN. Variable instantiation happens before variable initialization. Variables are instantiated with the undefined value of the Undefined type, not the null value of the Null object type. –  PointedEars Dec 19 '12 at 9:26

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