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Java Class Files filename$1.class… etc Question

I wrote a batch file to compile the java program and execute it. When I open the file location (via GUI), I see many .class files of the same file.

For example, say I have a file called "acView.java"

I see 3 compiled .class files - "acView$1.class" "acView$2.class" and "acView.class"

What do the $1 and $2 stand for? Why are they present?

The .java file is a JFrame if that's important.

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marked as duplicate by Matt Ball, alphazero, Vikdor, Andrew Thompson, durron597 Dec 19 '12 at 15:46

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The $1 simply means that class is an anonymous class and the number 1 is generated by the compiler. When you have two anonymous classes, it will have something like YourClass$1.class and YourClass$2.class in the compiled classes.

From your code, I believe you are implementing some Listener anonymously.

If you dont want compiler generate multiple classes, you move the code to normal class.

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Could elucidate a little more or provide a link with detailed information? Yes! I'm implementing a clickListener to a button. So, more listeners more "anonymous" classes? –  Torcellite Dec 19 '12 at 4:14
    
@Torcellite Correct, most probably you implement anonymously. –  Pau Kiat Wee Dec 19 '12 at 4:15
    
Is there a way to avoid this? –  Torcellite Dec 19 '12 at 4:16
2  
Yes, don't define classes scoped by a top level class. But the real question is why would you want to avoid it. –  alphazero Dec 19 '12 at 4:18
    
Just curiosity. I wanted to know if there was a solution. –  Torcellite Dec 19 '12 at 4:19

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