Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

HTML:

<td class="tabletd"> text one </td><br>
<td class="tabletd" id="tdSecond"> this is next td</td>
<button onclick="myFunc()">click</button>

JS:

function myFunc() {
    var second    = document.getElementById('tdSecond').innerHTML;
    //var second2 = document.getElementsByTagName('td')[1]; //gives error undefined
    alert(second);
}

I cannot make this work. Even there is no effect of css see JSFiddle.
But both javascript and css work fine if we use <li> without its parent <ul>.
And also javascript and css work fine on custom tag. for eg:- <ddd> text </ddd>

So why we get error on both css and javascript if we use <td> without its parent <table> ?

share|improve this question
4  
Because it's invalid HTML. If you use invalid HTML, you're relying on the browser's ability to make sense of it rather than parse it normally. –  Blender Dec 19 '12 at 5:23
1  
@Blender But then why does <li> without <ul> and made-up tags work fine? –  Ian Dec 19 '12 at 5:23
    
    
Why would you purposely write invalid markup? –  Chris Herbert Dec 19 '12 at 5:24
1  
@PankitKapadia That doesn't matter. In the spec, it gives a list of what the "valid" parents are. For <td>, it's <tr>. For <li>, it's <ul>, <ol>, and <menu>. So what does just saying "in an HTML table" matter? –  Ian Dec 19 '12 at 5:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you inspect the element in chrome you will notice the code has changed to the following:

<body>
    text one <br>
    this is next td
    <button onClick="myFunc()">click</button>
    <script type="text/javascript">//<![CDATA[ 

    function myFunc() {
    var second=document.getElementById('tdSecond').innerHTML;
    alert(second);

    //var second2=document.getElementsByTagName('td')[1].innerHTML;
    //alert(second2);  
    }

    //]]>  

    </script>
</body>

The td elements have been stripped by the browser as they are not valid.

share|improve this answer
1  
What makes a <td> any different from a <li> in this situation? A lonely <li> is "invalid", but it won't be stripped. Or a made-up tag of <ddd>? –  Ian Dec 19 '12 at 5:39
1  
It's a good question. This is up to the discretion of the browser or the rendering kit and I guess they seem to be more anal about <td> than <li>. –  3dgoo Dec 19 '12 at 5:47
1  
Hopefully someone more knowledgeable on this topic can come and enlighten us. –  3dgoo Dec 19 '12 at 5:51
1  
Please see my answer here: stackoverflow.com/a/13947123/821773 and also if you want to read more, this is a link for HTML parsing whatwg.org/specs/web-apps/current-work/multipage/parsing.html –  Calvin Dec 19 '12 at 7:03
1  
@3dgoo - HTML parser behaviour is informed more by the legacy of what browsers have traditionally done, than by any form of sanity, because modern browsers need to process old web pages the same way that the contemporary browsers did at time the page was written. Different programmers of those old browsers, at different times, chose different strategies for handling invalid mark-up. There's neither rhyme nor reason, just a whole bunch of specific rules which these days are described in detail at w3.org/html/wg/drafts/html/master/syntax.html#tree-construction –  Alohci Dec 19 '12 at 7:53

This would explain why <li> items can be without <ul>
http://www.whatwg.org/specs/web-apps/current-work/multipage/grouping-content.html#the-li-element

The li element represents a list item. If its parent element is an ol, ul, or menu element, then the element is an item of the parent element's list, as defined for those elements. Otherwise, the list item has no defined list-related relationship to any other li element.

If the parent element is an ol element, then the li element has an ordinal value.

<ul> is merely meant to group similar <li> items. Without the <ul>, a <li> is just an individual list item that is not grouped whatsoever. So having a <li> without a <ul> is still valid markup that the parser will pass.


<td> and <tr> elements specifically have to reside within a <table> element. http://www.whatwg.org/specs/web-apps/current-work/multipage/tabular-data.html#the-td-element

This is how tables are formed by the parser and having a <td> without a <table> will throw a table model error:
http://www.whatwg.org/specs/web-apps/current-work/multipage/tabular-data.html#table-model

This test shows:

<!-- fail -->
<tr>
  <td>tr_td_test</td>
</tr>

<!-- fail -->
<td>td_test</td>

<!-- pass as a regular list item -->
<li>li_test</li>

<!-- pass and tr tag is added to DOM -->
<table>
  <td>table_td_test 1</td>
</table>

<!-- pass and td tag is added to DOM -->
<table>
  <tr>
    table_tr_test_1
  </tr>
</table> 
share|improve this answer
    
Good answer. Cheers! –  3dgoo Dec 19 '12 at 8:52
1  
Thanks. I actually just learnt that while answering. :) –  Calvin Dec 19 '12 at 9:12

Try this.There are html problems. try this html

    <table border="1">
<tr>
<td class="tabletd"> text one </td><br>
<td class="tabletd" id="tdSecond"> this is next td</td>
</tr>
</table>
<button onclick="myFunc()">click</button>
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.