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Our application has ~10 threads doing separate tasks (no thread pools). We are not experiencing deadlock, but are always trying to lower latency to respond to a request so we are interested in determining which locks are the most contended. jconsole shows how often threads are blocked, and it isn't very often, but we still want to know which locks are the most contended.

We're running using the Sun JVM, so JLA from IBM is not useful, and we aren't running on Solaris so we can't use dTrace.

EDIT: I want to do this observation in production, where a profiler would slow the app unacceptably. This is a trading system, if we are slow, we lose money, so we don't run profilers in production. It is also quite hard to simulate the many exchanges we talk to in a performance test.

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dTrace is the only system I am personally aware of that does what you want without profiling tools. –  aperkins Sep 8 '09 at 16:04
    
Thinking more about this, I feel instrumentation is the best approach. You could either log individual lock requests or keep global counters. –  Miserable Variable Sep 9 '09 at 3:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Get a good profiler like YourKit. It can tell you how much time is spent waiting and blocking on particular methods and object monitors contained therein. For example:

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In regards to your comment about production metrics, you're quite limited in what you can gather. The most information you're going to get is from the ThreadMXBean which can give you metadata about all the running threads. It won't give you information about the contention of a specific object monitor though.

I don't want to get on my ivory tower here but I really feel that your best bet is to try to replicate your production environment as close as possible. Spending some time getting that set up now will pay dividends many times over in the future.

Even running a profiler with in a simulated-but-not-quite-good-enough environment will probably give you good information.

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JProfiler has similar functionality. But I want to do this observation in production, where a profiler would slow the app unacceptably. This is a trading system, if we are slow, we lose money, so we don't run profilers in production. It is also quite hard to simulate the many exchanges we talk to in a performance test environment. –  Ted Graham Sep 8 '09 at 15:56
    
@Ted, I'd edit your question to add that information as it dramatically alters what you can and can't do. –  Kevin Sep 8 '09 at 15:58
    
Thanks Kevin, edited. We have a performance test environment that has been very helpful in the past, but I think most high frequency finance shops have decided that spending too much time simulating the real world is not productive. I'll look for a trade where we can run a profiler in production without too much damage. –  Ted Graham Sep 8 '09 at 16:43
    
Saw your recommendation to simulate after posting my own advice along the same lines, but without your pointer to YourKit. –  CPerkins Sep 8 '09 at 17:36

Ted, I sympathize with your situation, but when performance is that critical, I'd recommend that you bite the bullet and simulate.

It shouldn't be as hard as you fear: instead of trying to generate message flow from your exchanges, why not record the incoming flow and replay it back on the simulation?

Without something like this, you're always going to be running into the Heisenberg problem: affecting the system you're measuring.

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For similar problem in database, we log a line just before requesting and immediately after acquiring a lock. We also log one after releasing. We then post-process this data to generate the kind of stats you are looking for.

EDIT: On top of a developed system, AspectJ might be a good option to generate the logs.

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