Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I had this table in oracle db, consist of 100+ columns:

ID number PK, CREATEDON date, C0 varchar2, C1 varchar2, ... ,c100 varchar2
0, 2012-12-19 05:18:21, 0, 1, ... ,100

I wanted to select them all with CREATEDON formated, so I wrote this query:

select *, to_char(CREATEDON, 'YYYY-MM-DD') from SOME_TABLE;

But then it threw out an error: ORA-00923: FROM keyword not found where expected.

Since I didn't want to write select ID, to_char(CREATEDON, 'YYYY-MM-DD'), col0, col1,...,col100 in every query, I went on to try another one:

select a.*, to_char(b.CREATEDON, 'YYYY-MM-DD') from SOME_TABLE a
join SOME_TABLE b on (a.ID = B.ID);

It worked fine, but should this join slow the whole query down as rows in SOME_TABLE increase?

So, is there a better way to do it?

share|improve this question
1  
you should probably alias the to_char call, eg to_char(CREATEDON, 'YYYY-MM-DD') AS co_formatted FROM SOME_TABLE... –  Phil Dec 19 '12 at 6:06
    
Which SQL client are you using? In SQL*Plus you can define column formats using the column command. For other SQL clients, check out how they format timestamp/date columns (some honor the NLS_xxx settings) –  a_horse_with_no_name Dec 19 '12 at 7:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This looks like an Oracle-specific issue. Try specifying the table for the * operator:

select SOME_TABLE.*, to_char(CREATEDON, 'YYYY-MM-DD') from SOME_TABLE;

See also this fiddle

share|improve this answer

It is an oracle specific issue. The problem is when using the general * operator they don't like you selecting any other column.

So suggesstion

select x.*, to_char(CREATEDON, 'YYYY-MM-DD') from SOME_TABLE x;
share|improve this answer

Try like this...

select a.*, to_char(CREATEDON, 'YYYY-MM-DD') from SOME_TABLE a;

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.