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Here I am using jQuery ajax:

$.ajax({
    type: "GET",
    url: URL,
    data: { Mode: "POB1"},
    success: function (data) {
        var Html = $.trim($(data).find("#divpob").html());
        if (Html) {
            $(Html).find(".lblpob").text("UserName" + Username);
            $(".DivRprt").html(Html);
        }
    }
});

here value of lblpob didn't get change, but if i use .clone() like this

if (Html) {
    var Html2 = $(Html).clone(true);
    $(Html2).find(".lblpob").text("UserName" + Username);
    Html = Html2;
    $(".DivRprt").html(Html);
}

lblpob gets changed.

What difference .clone() is making here ?

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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted
+50

There's an issue with temporary DOM objects and html as string. I'll break it down line by line:

What your first code does:

    var Html = $.trim($(data).find("#divpob").html());

Both the call to .html() and to $.trim() makes sure your Html var holds a string, not a live DOM object.

    $(Html) ...

This turns the Html string into a new DOM object (that you don't assign into a var),

    ... .find(".lblpob").text("UserName" + Username);

and change this unnamed DOM object. Not your Html string.

    $(".DivRprt").html(Html);

But here you use the original Html string to change the html of DivRprt.

What your other code does:

    var Html2 = $(Html).clone(true);

After creating a new DOM object and cloning it, you assign it into Html2,

    $(Html2).find(".lblpob").text("UserName" + Username);

and here you manipulate it.

    Html = Html2;
    $(".DivRprt").html(Html);

So here you insert the manipulated DOM object into .DivRprt

My option:

You don't need the .clone(), just keep track of the first DOM object:

    if (Html) {
        var Html2 = $(Html)
        Html2.find(".lblpob").text("UserName" + Username);
        $(".DivRprt").html(Html2);
    }

Or:

Just don't convert the trimmed data back to string

    var Html = $(data).find("#divpob");
    if (Html.length) {
        Html.find(".lblpob").text("UserName" + Username);
        $(".DivRprt").html(Html);
    }
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1  
+1 for the nice explanation. –  deadlock Feb 12 '13 at 18:59
    
Fantastic way of providing an answer. I'm going to attempt to use this type of format in future answers. –  jeuton Feb 12 '13 at 20:11
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In the second case, you're saving the jQuery result into a variable:

var Html2 = $(Html).clone(true);

It would have worked without the .clone() as well, because if you're making modifications to a jQuery collection without saving it into a variable or calling .appendTo(), those changes would be lost.

Improvement

Instead of doing DOM -> HTML serialization followed by HTML -> DOM, you can skip one step and avoid having to keep any variable by doing this:

$(data).find("#divpob")
    .find(".lblpob")
        .text("UserName" + Username) // modify
        .end()
    .appendTo('.DivRpt'); // append to container
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For jQuery is manipulating DOM, elements must be on DOM.

instead of:

var Html = $.trim($(data).find("#divpob").html());

replace:

var Html = $(data).find("#divpob");

instead of:

$(Html).find(".lblpob").text("UserName" + Username);

replace:

Html.find(".lblpob").text("UserName" + Username);

instead of:

$(".DivRprt").html(Html);

replace:

p$(".DivRprt").html(Html.html());

Because;

$(Html).find(".lblpob").text("UserName" + Username);

In here, $(Html) is instant object and you're manipulating instant object.

So your manipulations disappears.

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