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I know this might be a silly question, with an easy answer, but after an hour of searching the internet I could not find a way to do this;

    public bool GetCollision(int x, int y)
    {
        bool isPassable;

        if (x < 0 || x >= 20)
        {
            isPassable = false;
        }

        if (y < 0 || y >= 20)
        {
            isPassable = true;
        }

        return isPassable;
    }

On the second-to-last line it says that isPassable is unassigned... yet clearly I assign to it in the if statements. There must be some fundamental misunderstanding of "if" statements on my part.

So, how can I do this? Thank you very much.

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4  
What's the value of isPassable if, for example, x = 5 and y = 5 ? –  digEmAll Dec 19 '12 at 7:49
    
Another function altogether handles that. I'm implementing the collision (trying to at least) from Microsoft's Platformer Starter Kit. –  Sean Heiss Dec 19 '12 at 7:51
    
Yes ok, but C# compiler requires a value for each possible case. If you're sure that those cases will never happen just initialize isPassable with true or false, or maybe if you don't fall in your expected cases, just throw an exception... –  digEmAll Dec 19 '12 at 7:57
    
Google is your friend, for 'unassigned variable c#' you get first link to SO with Q and A, exactly the same! –  Gustav Klimt Dec 19 '12 at 7:59

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

That is because it doesn't have a default value set explicitly. Set isPassable to False by default and you're done.


Also you can do something like this:

return (!(x < 0 || x >= 20) && (y < 0 || y >= 20))

EDIT: The above solution would only work if an AND relationship would exist between your IFs.

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Your return value expression is wrong. For example with x=-1 and y=-1 returns false while the OP method would return true. –  digEmAll Dec 19 '12 at 8:10
    
You're right, there isn't an AND relationship between his IFs –  dutzu Dec 19 '12 at 8:22

What is the result of this function if x == 10 and y == 10? You have not defined what that result would be, and that is why the compiler is complaining. In this example, the first if statement would evaluate to false, and nothing would happen. Then the second if statement would evaluate to false, and the function would try to return with no value assigned to isPassable.

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If none of If conditions evaluate to True, the variable will have nothing to return.

So, assign a default value to isPassable.

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The problem is that there are conditions under which the variable is not assigned at all. For instance, if x and y are both 0, the routine will return an unassigned variable. That is a no-no.

To clarify, the problem is not that there is no initial assigment (like isPassable = false;) but that the compiler warns you that you may have forgotten to check some conditions.

A construct like

bool isPassable;
if (...)
    isPassable = true;
else
    isPassable = false;
return isPassable;

would have been OK!

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"isPassable is Unassigned" Compiler is complaining because what if neither IF condition is satisfied . So you need to assign a value to it while declaring it like:-

 isPassable=false;
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That should be "what if neither if condition is satisfied" –  Jonathon Reinhart Dec 19 '12 at 8:14
    
Sorry for bad English..I'll update my language..thanks –  Pranav Dec 19 '12 at 8:48
    
No problem - normally I wouldn't worry about such things, but here it actually affected the meaning of the sentence. –  Jonathon Reinhart Dec 19 '12 at 14:02

You could also do it this way:

public bool GetCollision(int x, int y)
{
    bool isPassable = false;

    if (y < 0 || y >= 20)
    {
        isPassable = true;
    }

    return isPassable;
}

This way, you can make sure that it returns true only when this condition is met, otherwise it returns just false.

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You should've a default-value:

bool isPassable = false;

If you can't exactly say, whether it's true or false, use nullable values instead, so isPassable can be null:

public bool? GetCollision(int x, int y)
{
    bool? isPassable = null;

    if (x < 0 || x >= 20)
    {
        isPassable = false;
    }

    if (y < 0 || y >= 20)
    {
        isPassable = true;
    }

    return isPassable;
}
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Are you sure that would work? I can't test now, but I believe this too would require isPassable to be assigned, before the error would go away. The only difference is that you can assign null if you want. –  Mr Lister Dec 19 '12 at 13:41
    
Yeah. Now that you say that, I'm not sure, too. I'll edit the answer. –  looper Dec 19 '12 at 13:44

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