Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Java world I always press F3 if I want to jump into a method or class, variable... anything really.

I am now working on a Javascript project and I am finding the F3 (Open Decleration) extremely limiting in Eclipse and in Aptana. Its actually almost non-existent, working only for declared variables in methods.

Our project has grown to about 50 Javascript files (~60 Javascript "objects"), and things are becoming almost unmanagable because of situations like this :

this.url = Util.buildURLFor(URLs.ticketPrefillData);

The Util object is in a file called Toolbox, and the URLs object is in a file called URLManager. The question is, how is anyone supposed to know that it is in the Toolbox file? And why can't the IDE pick out all the objects in all the files, so the F3 knows where to go.

As the javascript files grow it is becoming unmanageable (in an agile project this can be fatal) and we are thinking of switching back to Java in the form of Vaadin or ZK, unless we can find a decent intelligent IDE for code navigation.

In Summary, I need a JS IDE which can do this :

I have a method in file A which calls a method on class B1 which is in file B. It seems like no IDE i have come across can make that association.

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by deceze, T.J. Crowder, Alex, gnat, dystroy Dec 19 '12 at 9:44

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
They don't make that association because there is no way to tell for sure: JS is a scripting language, therefore there are no "strict" relationships between files. You may have 10 methods in 10 different files which fit your method calls, and which one is executed is up to which files you've loaded at the moment. The fact that there is no "include" concept makes things even harder. –  Alex Dec 19 '12 at 9:30
    
yes, but cant an IDE make an educated guess at least? –  Oliver Watkins Dec 19 '12 at 9:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Check out WebStorm by JetBrains. I haven't used it but have heard great things about it. It supports code navigation, and judging by ReSharper, JetBrains are really good at it.

Currently, I use Visual Studio 2012, which has great (enough, for me) navigation when you add references to your used javascript files. So in file A, when you use code in file B, you would just add this to the top of your file:

/// <reference path="./B.js" />

From now, you have Intellisense and code navigation. (VS2010 has similar features but isn't as powerful, if I recall correctly)

(your question is however kind of subjective, so might get closed/flagged; try to avoid asking questions where you ask people what they use/prefer; see the FAQ for more info)

share|improve this answer
    
what makes it subjective? Is it the use of the word "best" ? –  Oliver Watkins Dec 19 '12 at 8:55
    
Yeah sort of. But essentially you're asking a list of links to tools, which is a hard question to answer. Everyone has his/her preference, so there isn't really one specific answer. I've asked questions like this that were flagged. As you are new to SO, I don't want to do this, but others are more strict in these matters. –  Peter Dec 19 '12 at 8:59
    
thanks for the advice. But can webstorm deal with the F3 situation as described by me? –  Oliver Watkins Dec 19 '12 at 9:16
    
I like Notepad. It's the "bestest". :) –  Gordon Freeman Dec 19 '12 at 10:34
    
I edited my answer to provide more info. –  Peter Dec 19 '12 at 10:56

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.