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I saw that aliases can be used after FROM, for example,

SELECT *
FROM Employee as Emp
WHERE Emp.id = 10

I want a command which sets Employee ALIAS to Emp. I want to use it like this -

Employee ALIAS Emp -- is there a command like this ?
SELECT Emp.ColumnOne, Emp.ColumnTwo  
FROM Emp
WHERE Emp.id = 10 

Does such a command exist ?

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4  
What is the use case? –  kmkaplan Dec 19 '12 at 8:47
1  
Is the current SQL syntax not comfortable to you? –  Raptor Dec 19 '12 at 8:48
    
@kmkaplan - just convenience. why type full table names after FROM ? Why not do it from the start. This will be nice for joins that involve a lot of tables. –  david blaine Dec 19 '12 at 8:49
    
@ShivanRaptor - Now, i am confused. Is my question proper ? –  david blaine Dec 19 '12 at 8:50
3  
@davidblaine The example you give shows the opposite: it is more verbose and I fail to see what convenience it brings. –  kmkaplan Dec 19 '12 at 8:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use the “normal” syntax:

SELECT Emp.ColumnOne, Emp.ColumnTwo
    FROM Employee as Emp
    WHERE Emp.id = 10
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Thanks, that works too and does not modify the database. Wow, it was unintuitive and unexpected. –  david blaine Dec 19 '12 at 9:08
    
There is a minor complaint though - when working in management studio, you will not get (edit) column names automatically next to emp, unlike when you use Employee. Maybe they should make a command like Employee ALIAS IS Emp. –  david blaine Dec 19 '12 at 9:10
1  
@davidblaine You mean “column names” I presume. Anyways I can’t give you any help about this software as I really do not know it. But you could send them a feature request… After all it is the season for wishes :-) –  kmkaplan Dec 19 '12 at 9:13
    
What an apt comment. Thanks for the help. :) –  david blaine Dec 19 '12 at 9:15

What you want is called a SYNONYM.

Note that this is a server-side object, and it will live in the database, not in the query definition.

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Ah yes synonyms are more fit than views. –  kmkaplan Dec 19 '12 at 8:51
    
@kmkaplan - please include your answer as a comment so that readers can see alternate methods of doing the same thing, regardless of which is better. –  david blaine Dec 19 '12 at 8:53
    
SWeko - CREATE SYNONYM [ schema_name_1. ] synonym_name FOR <object> Is this correct - CREATE SYNONYM Company700 Emp FOR Employee –  david blaine Dec 19 '12 at 8:55
2  
@davidblaine OK, I originally suggested using views: create view Emp as select * from Employee. But for your specific question synonyms could be better. –  kmkaplan Dec 19 '12 at 8:55
1  
@davidblaine: CREATE SYNONYM Emp FOR Employee is good enough, it all is within the same schema. Synonyms are really useful when you have to work with more than one schema, though. –  SWeko Dec 19 '12 at 8:58

From Microsoft SQL Server 2005 you can use CTE:

With Emp as (
  select * from Employee 
)
SELECT Emp.ColumnOne, Emp.ColumnTwo  
FROM Emp
WHERE Emp.id = 10 

CTE is more powerful than you require in your question but match your syntax.

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