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I am writing a program to calculate factorial using recursion of main() function.

/* Print factorial */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

static char **p;

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
        int n, rv;
        if (argc < 2) {
                printf("Usage: a.out <value>\n");
                exit(-1);
        }
        n = atoi(argv[1]);
        if (!n) {
                rv = 0;
        } else {
                if (n == 1) {
                        rv = 1;
                } else {
                        n = n - 1;
                        **p = n;
                        main(2, p);
                }
        }
        printf("%d\n", rv);
        return 0;
}

The program compiles using gcc but on execution, I am getting a Segmentation Fault at **p = n. Can somebody help me to modify the above program to get the correct result. Also, what is the logic to capture correct rv value between successive recursive calls in main()?

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closed as not a real question by billz, WhozCraig, nhahtdh, Max MacLeod, AlphaMale Dec 19 '12 at 11:31

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Why would you explicitly use something that you know is bad? –  Mark Garcia Dec 19 '12 at 8:51
    
How to remove the seg-fault first? –  Manav Dec 19 '12 at 8:56
1  
@icepack: FUBAR - Fully Upvoted Because of Arbitrary Recursion –  Manav Dec 19 '12 at 8:59
    
p is unassigned, can't deference it. Do it correctly: try to write 'standard' code with good practices –  Tio Pepe Dec 19 '12 at 9:12
    
You should compile with all warnings and debugging info, that is with gcc -Wall -g on Linux, improve your code till no warnings are given, and learn to use the gdb debugger (and also valgrind) –  Basile Starynkevitch Dec 19 '12 at 9:12
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Since you don't seem to care about standard and stuffs, here is an implementation of the recursive main function for printing factorial, that compiles on gcc (I only test on Windows). Since it doesn't follow standard, there is no guarantee that it will compiles on other compiler/platform.

Writing such code for fun is OK, but never let the bad behavior follows into serious coding project or workplace.

/* Print factorial */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char buf[16];

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
        int n, rv;

        if (argc < 2) {
                printf("Usage: a.out <value>\n");
                exit(-1);
        }

        n = atoi(argv[1]);
        if (!n) {
                rv = 1;
        } else {
                if (n == 1) {
                    rv = 1;
                } else {
                    char *pt = buf;
                    char **pt2 = &pt - 1;

                    sprintf(buf, "%d", n - 1);
                    rv = main(2, pt2) * n;
                }
        }
        printf("%d\n", rv);

        return rv;
}
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YeeeHoooo... yes this solved my problem ! –  Manav Dec 19 '12 at 9:21
    
How can you claim "here is a working implementation"? - at best it happens to work on some set of tested platforms, as far as you could tell. –  Tony D Dec 19 '12 at 9:47
    
@TonyD: Agree, edited. It is bad code anyway. –  nhahtdh Dec 19 '12 at 9:50
1  
Well -1 to +1 for the more appropriately cautioned example - hackers, live long and crash...! –  Tony D Dec 19 '12 at 11:00
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The program is ill-formed, it is illegal to call main anywhere in the program.

3.6.1 Main function [basic.start.main]

3) The function main shall not be used within a program. [...]

Also, because static char **p; is value-initialized (i.e. it will be NULL), you can't dereference p. So after you take out the main recursion, you can initialize p to something meaningful.

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1  
"it is illegal to call main anywhere in the program." : Except from crt0.s that is ;-) –  anishsane Dec 19 '12 at 8:58
3  
crt0.s is not part of the program, but part of the implementation (like the standard library) –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Dec 19 '12 at 9:08
7  
This answer is only valid for C++. In C it is legal to call main recursively. –  Jens Gustedt Dec 19 '12 at 10:02
    
C standard says nothing about forbidding recursive main calls. –  this Mar 3 at 4:07
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Only operating system can call main when it runs the program. Other than operating system no one can call any function named main. So if want to calculate factorial using recursion then you have to write another function to calculate that recursively and call that function from main.

You can ask why is this? Answer is this is the syntax.

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