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I'm wondering what the correct way to compare two characters ignoring case that will work for all cultures. Also, is Comparer<char>.Default the best way to test two characters without ignoring case? Does this work for surrogate-pairs?

EDIT: Added sample IComparer<char> implementation

If this helps anyone this is what I've decided to use

public class CaseInsensitiveCharComparer : IComparer<char> {
    private readonly System.Globalization.CultureInfo ci;
    public CaseInsensitiveCharComparer(System.Globalization.CultureInfo ci) {
        this.ci = ci;
    }
    public CaseInsensitiveCharComparer()
        : this(System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture) { }
    public int Compare(char x, char y) {
        return Char.ToUpper(x, ci) - Char.ToUpper(y, ci);
    }
}

// Prints 3
Console.WriteLine("This is a test".CountChars('t', new CaseInsensitiveCharComparer()));
share|improve this question
    
ToUpper may convert the char to the correct upper case with respect to the current culture, but the lexical order returned is not correct. Possibly this is only supported in .NET for the string comparisons. –  Holstebroe Nov 20 '13 at 14:44

7 Answers 7

up vote 34 down vote accepted

It depends on what you mean by "work for all cultures". Would you want "i" and "I" to be equal even in Turkey?

You could use:

bool equal = char.ToUpperInvariant(x) == char.ToUpperInvariant(y);

... but I'm not sure whether that "works" according to all cultures by your understanding of "works".

Of course you could convert both characters to strings and then perform whatever comparison you want on the strings. Somewhat less efficient, but it does give you all the range of comparisons available in the framework:

bool equal = x.ToString().Equals(y.ToString(), 
                                 StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase);
share|improve this answer
    
That's the way I had thought of doing it in both of your examples but thought there might have been a better way that I had not have known existed that the framework provides. I was thinking in the context of the LINQ extension method for String.Contains(char, IEqualityComparer<char>) –  Brett Ryan Sep 8 '09 at 16:27
    
There's no framework method for this: string comparison is actually implemented using native methods, not by dropping down to a Comparer<char> implementation. –  Julian Birch Sep 9 '09 at 8:48

Using the default (that is not the invariant) culture:

if (char.ToLower(ch1) == char.ToLower(ch2))
{  ....  }

Or specify a culture:

CultureInfo myCulture = ...;
if (char.ToLower(ch1, myCulture) == char.ToLower(ch2, myCulture))
{  ....  }
share|improve this answer
    
I can't down-vote, but I did give you an up-vote as I do think your solution is quite appropriately answerd. –  Brett Ryan Sep 8 '09 at 17:36
    
Brett, somebody voted down, no big deal but if there is anything wrong I would like to learn what. –  Henk Holterman Sep 8 '09 at 17:55
    
This is not an answer to the question. –  Jon Grant Sep 8 '09 at 18:39
    
Jon, agreed but I read the "that will work for all cultures" as a a little over-optimistic and unrealistic. I should have stated the obvious. –  Henk Holterman Sep 8 '09 at 21:13

string.Compare("string a","STRING A",true)

It will work for every string

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Hi Sergio, I'm after a way to compare two char instances, not string instances. I'm looking for a Comparer<char> implementation that ignores case. –  Brett Ryan Sep 8 '09 at 16:19
8  
This works great in English speaking countries. However, nobody in eastern Europe will ever use an application you write. –  Jon Grant Sep 8 '09 at 16:22
2  
@Jon Grant: I use this at my country (Portugal), Portuguese is a Latin based language that has lots of "weird" characters like: ã é à ç, it works perfectly for me. –  Sergio Sep 8 '09 at 16:33

As I understand it, there isn't really a way that will "work for all cultures". Either you want to compare characters for some kind of internal, non-displayed-to-the-user reason (in which case you should use the InvariantCulture), or you want to use the CurrentCulture of the user. Obviously, using the user's current culture will mean that you will get different results in different locales, but they will be consistent with what your users in those locales will expect.

Without knowing more about WHY you are comparing two characters, I can't really advise you on which one you should be using.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jon, it's a general question, I'm not versed well with unicode and thought I'd pose the question here. Consider the String.Contains(char, IEqualityComparer<char>) extension method that LINQ provides, what would be the correct way to implement that being case-insensitive? –  Brett Ryan Sep 8 '09 at 16:25
    
Again, it would really depend on what the data was and why you were comparing it. It you just wanted to sort things into some consistent order for example, using any of the various Invariant comparisons would be fine. If you're responding to user input, you probably want to use the culture of that user to give them results they would expect. I'm not sure there is really a "one size fits all" answer. –  Jon Grant Sep 8 '09 at 16:30
    
Do you think my Comparer implementation provided as an answer would be a correct approach? –  Brett Ryan Sep 8 '09 at 16:51

I would recommend comparing uppercase, and if they don't match then comparing lowercase, just in case the locale's uppercasing and lowercasing logic behave slightly different.

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You could try:

    class Test{
    static int Compare(char t, char p){
        return string.Compare(t.ToString(), p.ToString(), StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase);
    }
}

But I doubt this is the "optimal" way to do it, but I'm not all of the cases you need to be checking...

share|improve this answer

What I was thinking that would be available within the runtime is something like the following

public class CaseInsensitiveCharComparer : IComparer<char> {
    private readonly System.Globalization.CultureInfo ci;
    public CaseInsensitiveCharComparer(System.Globalization.CultureInfo ci) {
        this.ci = ci;
    }
    public CaseInsensitiveCharComparer()
        : this(System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture) { }
    public int Compare(char x, char y) {
        return Char.ToUpper(x, ci) - Char.ToUpper(y, ci);
    }
}

// Prints 3
Console.WriteLine("This is a test".CountChars('t', new CaseInsensitiveCharComparer()));
share|improve this answer
1  
It's dangerous to assume that the char comparison by subtraction will continue to be correct in future CLR versions, so I would use return Char.ToUpper(x, ci).CompareTo(Char.ToUpper(y, ci)); instead. –  Matt Howells Nov 13 '09 at 16:14
    
@MattHowells I would argue that ... please see char.CompareTo(char): return (m_value-value); –  Andreas Niedermair May 27 at 8:27

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