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On the 16th December, a HTML5 extension specification for the <main> element was submitted to the W3C under something called an editors draft. The abstract is as follows:

This specification is an extension to the HTML5 specification [HTML5]. It defines an element to be used for the identification of the main content area of a document. All normative content in the HTML5 specification, unless specifically overridden by this specification, is intended to be the basis for this specification.

The main element formalises the common practice of identification of the main content section of a document using the id values such as 'content' and 'main'. It also defines an HTML element that embodies the semantics and function of the WAI-ARIA [ARIA] landmark role=main.

Example:

<!-- other content -->

<main>

  <h1>Apples</h1>
 <p>The apple is the pomaceous fruit of the apple tree.</p>

 <article>
 <h2>Red Delicious</h2>
  <p>These bright red apples are the most common found in many
  supermarkets.</p>
  <p>... </p>
  <p>... </p>
  </article>

  <article>
  <h2>Granny Smith</h2>
  <p>These juicy, green apples make a great filling for
  apple pies.</p>
  <p>... </p>
  <p>... </p>
  </article>

</main>

<!-- other content -->

It's got all the info in there and I feel I should start incorporating it into web pages. As far as I know now, the HTML5 spec is just progressive with new features been "bolted" on to the spec with no upgrade. I guess that means the browsers will start implementing it when they can - the question is, how long does this take and how do I know all browsers support it? Should I just build it like so for now and resort to a polyfill?

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1  
The document cited is a mistitled proposal, nothing more. (Mistitled because its author is not one of HTML5 editors.) There have been heavy discussions around the idea, but it would be wrong to treat main as part of HTML5 (which itself is work in progress, though now received Proposed Recommendation status : w3.org/TR/html5). –  Jukka K. Korpela Dec 19 '12 at 11:19
1  
As far as I know however, Steve Faulkner is a contributor and the idea is backed by the likes of Bruce Lawson - does this hold any bearing? –  rickyduck Dec 19 '12 at 11:49
3  
It is not mis-titled and not a proposal it is a W3C First Public Working Draft (FPWD) approved for publication if you care to get you facts straight Jukka you can findout more about extension specifications in Plan 2014 dev.w3.org/html5/decision-policy/…. The main element has broad support among users developers and implementers. Before becoming a FPWD the likes of Apple, Microsoft, Mozilla and Opera (all members of the HTML WG) can object to publication (none did)> –  Steve Faulkner Dec 20 '12 at 22:32
1  
@rickyduck note: A W3C editors draft is the copy of the spec with the latest edits in it. A W3C working draft is a published snapshot e.g.w3.org/TR/html-main-element –  Steve Faulkner Dec 20 '12 at 22:41
1  
its not up to hixie to decide, implementers decide: implementation of <main> in firefox has been assigned bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=820508 so it looks like it is happening :-) –  Steve Faulkner Dec 21 '12 at 13:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Support for <main> will be much like support for any other new container element introduced in HTML 5.

  • New enough browsers will support it.
  • Older browsers will let you style it so it is display: block and give you the visual effects of it
  • Older versions of IE won't support it at all without a JavaScript shim (which will work in exactly the same way as the ones for all the other new container elements).

The "when" depends on what level of browser support you need and how willing you are to depend on a JS shim.

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1  
So essentially, I can actually use the <main> element now with the required fallbacks, with no implications whatsoever and then whenever the application is submitted it will be semantically more effective? Is there not a chance also, that the element itself won't be "bolted on" to the spec? –  rickyduck Dec 19 '12 at 9:34
1  
With the same provisos as any other new element, yes. The spec is still subject to change, anything could be removed. –  Quentin Dec 19 '12 at 9:50
4  
The element is not (yet) part of the HTML5 draft (and still less the WHATWG “Living Standard”). But with the provisions presented in the answer, it can be used almost as safely as the <dwim> element, except that <main> may actually make its way to the spec and to browsers, possibly with a defined meaning, default rendering, and expected browser behavior that surprise you. –  Jukka K. Korpela Dec 19 '12 at 11:23
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That would be the HTML 5.1 draft (w3.org/html/wg/drafts/html/master/Overview.html) you mean? The main element spec has equal standing to any of the new features that appear in HTML 5.1 and whether it is in the WHATWG standard or not, is of little significance. –  Steve Faulkner Dec 20 '12 at 22:36
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@SteveFaulkner, the document you cite here says: “It is inappropriate to cite this document as other than work in progress.” (Besides, as of now, it does not describe a main element but instead lists the main content under “Common idioms without dedicated elements”.) –  Jukka K. Korpela Dec 20 '12 at 23:21

For now, I would be careful about usng it.

For the future of the proposal, what really matters is implementation in browsers. In particular, because <main> is a proposed block level element, it will require a change to the HTML5 parser implementation as well as giving it the default ARIA role of main.

Without the default ARIA role, there is no point to the element, although using it now in preparation for that is a reasonable approach.

The parser change does require a modicum of care though. Remember that the </p> tag is optional. Now suppose you decide that before your "main" content you want a paragraph of preamble. You could write:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<body>
  <p> This is my page preamble ...
  <main>
    My main content ...
    <div>
       A story ...
    </div>
  </main>
</body>

If and when browsers implement the <main> element, the <main> tag will automatically close the <p> element and in the DOM, the <p> element and the <main> element will be siblings of one another. The <div> element and its content will be a child of the <main> element. i.e. The DOM will be:

HTML
 +--HEAD
 +--BODY
     +--P
     |  +--This is my page preamble ... 
     +--MAIN
         +--My main content ...
         +--DIV
             +--A story 

However, right now in browsers, the <main> becomes a child element of the <p> element, and while "My main content ..." is a child of the <main> element, the <div> element is not. i.e. the DOM has this structure:

HTML
 +--HEAD
 +--BODY
     +--P
     |  +--This is my page preamble ...
     |  +--MAIN
     |      +--My main content ... 
     +--DIV
        +--A story 

Now, of course, this is easily avoided by explicitly using a </p> tag, on the preamble paragraph, but it is a trap for the unwary.

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Raised a very good point! Thanks for your input! Out of habit, personally I always use </p> but like you say, certainly a trap for the unwary. –  rickyduck Dec 20 '12 at 10:45
    
Since what time did changing element's display property resulted in chage of HTML parsing rules? You want to say putting a div inside an a wold actually make the a be inside the div as well? jsfiddle.net/ufmnb –  Spadar Shut Jan 14 '13 at 13:27
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@SpadarShut - It doesn't. When I say "block-level", I mean equivalent to the HTML4 DTD's %block; entity definition, not the CSS display property. HTML5 doesn't really have the same concept but flow content elements that aren't also phrasing content elements is kind of similar. –  Alohci Jan 14 '13 at 13:40

The HTML 5.1 main element is now implemented in Webkit. Validation support to follow shortly. Expect Firefox implementation soonish.

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How about Opera? –  rickyduck Jan 22 '13 at 10:29
1  
expect they will implement reasonable soon –  Steve Faulkner Jan 22 '13 at 10:32
    
@SteveFaulkner - Kudos to you Steve. Is there any chance of an example being added to the 5.1 spec where the main element clearly isn't at the scooby-doo point? Maybe something like the sample in my answer? –  Alohci Jan 22 '13 at 11:09
    
@Alohci have added a bug w3.org/Bugs/Public/show_bug.cgi?id=20730 will get to it. –  Steve Faulkner Jan 22 '13 at 11:15
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<main> element just landed in mozilla-inbound land bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=820508#c36 –  Steve Faulkner Jan 29 '13 at 13:34

You can go ahead and use it, Chrome 26 and Firefox 21 already implemented it.

Just as with the introduction of many other new HTML5 elements, not all browsers recognise <main> or have preset styles for it. You’ll need to ensure it displays as a block level element in your CSS:

main {display:block;}

For the time being, you'll also need to use JavaScript to create the element for older versions of IE:

<script>document.createElement('main');</script>

Of course, if you use the html5shiv, <main> is now baked in directly.

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