Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Java += operator

In Java, this is not valid (doesn't compile), as expected:

long lng = 0xffffffffffffL;
int i;
i = 5 + lng;    //"error: possible loss of magnitude"

But this is perfectly fine (?!)

long lng = 0xffffffffffffL;
int i = 5;
i += lng;       //compiles just fine

This is obviously a narrowing operation, that can possibly exceed the int range. So why doesn't the compiler complain?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Marko Topolnik, Rohit Jain, dasblinkenlight, Peter Lawrey, PermGenError Dec 19 '12 at 10:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
This question invites discussion instead of a clear-cut answer. –  Marko Topolnik Dec 19 '12 at 10:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

i += lng; compound assignment operator cast's implicitly.

i+=lng; 
is same as 
i = int(i+lng);

FROM JLS:

A compound assignment expression of the form E1 op= E2 is equivalent to E1 = (T) ((E1) op (E2)), where T is the type of E1, except that E1 is evaluated only once.

share|improve this answer
1  
So it seems, but why? It seems to me to go against the gist of the language. –  Cristi Diaconescu Dec 19 '12 at 10:06
    
@CristiDiaconescu, This implicit cast happens without errors because there is no syntax available to make it explicit. For example you wouldn't be able to *=1.5 an integer otherwise. –  Robert Nov 13 '14 at 20:19

This is defined in the JLS #15.26.2:

A compound assignment expression of the form E1 op= E2 is equivalent to E1 = (T) ((E1) op (E2)), where T is the type of E1, except that E1 is evaluated only once.

In other words, i += lng performs a cast implicitly.

share|improve this answer
    
not jelous, but i said the same darn thing in my answer a minute befor you and i got no reps.. :P –  PermGenError Dec 19 '12 at 10:13
2  
@GanGnaMStYleOverFlowErroR You just rephrased OP's question. assylias got upvoted for referencing the JLS. As opposed to you, he posted that in the first revision, and was the first one to post it; you needed about 5 revisions to get there (and only after seeing others' answers). –  Marko Topolnik Dec 19 '12 at 10:14
    
@GanGnaMStYleOverFlowErroR Sorry about that - but I'm certainly not going to give away the 3 hats I just got ;-) –  assylias Dec 19 '12 at 10:15
    
dammit, is it all about the hats now?? :) –  Marko Topolnik Dec 19 '12 at 10:16
1  
@MarkoTopolnik mark as said earlier, i am not greedy or something. i totally agree with you that my answer wasn't as clear as assylias or NPE, i was only making a conversation :p, and i would love to be a better cobntributor to SO .. :) –  PermGenError Dec 19 '12 at 10:30

The compiler does not complain because, according to JLS §15.26.2. Compound Assignment Operators:

A compound assignment expression of the form E1 op= E2 is equivalent to E1 = (T) ((E1) op (E2)), where T is the type of E1, except that E1 is evaluated only once.

Thus,

i += lng;

is equivalent to

i = (int)(i + lng);
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.