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ref: linux clock_gettime

I found a formula which works well to get the processing time, but there's something I don't understand. See the result below.

The first 2 rows is just to show the forumla in their respective columns.

I'm only showing 3 results from a quick run.
The interesting part is in the last row, why is 5551 - 999896062 nanoseconds = 18446744072709661105?
Why is 18446744072709661105+1/1E9 = 0.000109?

I think there's some data conversion going on that affects the results?

xx:      | t1.tv_sec |   | t1.tv_nsec |          | t2.tv_sec |   | t2.tv_nsec 
xx:      t2-t1(sec)      t2-t1(nsec)         (t2-t1(sec))+(t2-t1(nsec))/1E9

52291:   | 30437 |   | 999649886 |       | 30437 |   | 999759331 
52291:   0   109445          0.000109

52292:   | 30437 |   | 999772970 |       | 30437 |   | 999882416 
52292:   0   109446          0.000109

52293:   | 30437 |   | 999896062 |       | 30438 |   | 5551 
52293:   1   18446744072709661105        0.000109

source code:

int main() {
    struct timespec t1, t2;

    int i = 0;
    while(1) {
        clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, &t1);
            for(int j=0;j<25000;j++) { };
        clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, &t2);
        printf("%d: \t | %llu | \t | %lu | \t\t | %llu | \t | %lu \n", i, (unsigned long long) t1.tv_sec, t1.tv_nsec, (unsigned long long) t2.tv_sec, t2.tv_nsec);
        printf("%d: \t %llu \t %lu \t\t %lf\n", i, (unsigned long long) t2.tv_sec - t1.tv_sec, t2.tv_nsec - t1.tv_nsec, (t2.tv_sec - t1.tv_sec)+(t2.tv_nsec - t1.tv_nsec)/1E9);
        if ((t2.tv_sec - t1.tv_sec) == 1) break;
        i++;
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Why don't you convert the result of clock_gettime() to a 64-bit number of nanoseconds? Makes life so much easier. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Dec 19 '12 at 16:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because 5551 - 999896062 is some negative value, stored in a temp variable of type long, but interpreted by printf as "unsigned long" due to the %lu conversion specifier.

Note that the tv_nsec field in struct timespec is of type long, not unsigned long. Similarly, on Linux and other Unix systems time_t is a typedef for a signed integer type. So get rid of all the unsigned stuff in your code.

Btw, a way to to substract two timespec instances is


timespec diff(timespec start, timespec end)
{
        timespec temp;
        if ((end.tv_nsec - start.tv_nsec) < 0) 
        {
                temp.tv_sec = end.tv_sec - start.tv_sec - 1;
                temp.tv_nsec = 1000000000 + end.tv_nsec - start.tv_nsec;
        } 
        else 
        {
                temp.tv_sec = end.tv_sec - start.tv_sec;
                temp.tv_nsec = end.tv_nsec - start.tv_nsec;
        }
        return temp;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think your solution is a C++ solution? But anyway, you're right about the unsigned long printing format. Changed that, and it returned the correct numbers which I could then verify the results manually. Thanks. Just curious, how does one verify a nanosecond accuracy, since there's no physical medium to measure it. And how does the CLOCK_MONOTONIC work? Read that it represents the epoch time since 1970. But how can one verify its nanosecond accuracy? Would it be the same across all machines? –  resting Dec 20 '12 at 2:16
    
@resting: Right, I copy-pasted it from some C++ code I had lying around. But if you change "timespec" to "struct timespec" it should work in plain C as well. –  janneb Dec 20 '12 at 9:01
    
@resting: CLOCK_MONOTONIC represents time since some unspecified time in the past (e.g. on Linux zero is set to some time before the boot time of the system), and is monotonic, i.e. does not change e.g. if the system clock is changed. CLOCK_REALTIME represents time since the epoch. –  janneb Dec 20 '12 at 9:05

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