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How do I need to match the no of open braces equal to no of close braces using regular expression. here is the code,..

var expression1 = "count(machineId)+count(toolId)";
var expression2 = "count(machineId)+count(toolId))";

These are the 2 expression, where in the expression1, the no of open brackets is equal to no of close brackets and in expression2, the no of open brackets is not equal to no of close brackets. Hence I need a regular expression, which counts the no of open brackets and close brackets and gives me the alert. I need to check for the valid syntax too.

 if(expression1.......){ // here goes the regular expression
    alert("Matched");
 }
else{
   alert("Not matched");
}

Thanks in advance!!

share|improve this question
7  
Do you also need to account for the order? var expression3 = "count)macineId(+count)toolId(" may be matched but is not valid syntax –  Adrian G Dec 19 '12 at 10:53
2  
...as it makes a huge difference to whether you can use JavaScript regular expressions for this. ;-) –  T.J. Crowder Dec 19 '12 at 10:54
1  
Why don't you try Stack? –  theharshest Dec 19 '12 at 10:55
2  
Yes, i need to consider the valid syntax too... @Adrian –  madhu Dec 19 '12 at 10:57
    
@madhu You should have mentioned it in the question from the start. –  VisioN Dec 19 '12 at 10:58

7 Answers 7

up vote 53 down vote accepted
var expression1 = "count(machineId)+count(toolId)";
var expression2 = "count(machineId)+count(toolId))";

if (matches(expression1)) {
    alert("Matched"); // Triggered!
}
else {
    alert("Not matched");
}

if (matches(expression2)) {
    alert("Matched");
}
else {
    alert("Not matched"); // Triggered!
}

function matches(str) {
    try {
        new Function(str);
        return true;
    }
    catch (e) {
        return !(e instanceof SyntaxError);
    }
}

This works because new Function() will cause a syntax error if your code is wrong. Catching the error means you can handle it safely and do whatever you want. Another good thing is that it doesn't execute the code, it just parses it. Basically, you're leveraging your task to the browser's parser.

It doesn't use regex, but it does check if your code is valid. Thus, it tells you if the parentheses match.

share|improve this answer
    
@ florian, thanks it worked!!!! –  madhu Dec 19 '12 at 11:15
11  
No words. That's perfect. +100. –  VisioN Dec 19 '12 at 11:19
    
Yay! Thanks :-) –  Florian Margaine Dec 19 '12 at 11:22
    
Good solution, the error scenario returns true though return !(e instanceof SyntaxError); –  Drew Dec 25 '12 at 18:55
4  
You can easily implement this using a loop which is O(n). Using a function constructor to simply do parsing is a lot more expensive. Checking for matching parenthesis only require the first 2 stages of the compiler (scanner and parser). While that implementation is in C/C++, it is unlikely to be faster than O(n) when dealing with a large N. –  voidvector May 28 '13 at 19:31

Task can be simply solved without regexp, just count braces.

var a = 'count(machineId)+count())toolId)'
var braces = 0;
for (var i=0, len=a.length; i<len; ++i) {
   switch(a[i]) {
       case '(' : 
          ++braces;
          break;
       case ')' : 
           --braces;
           break;
   }
   if (braces < 0) {    
      alert('error');
      break;
   }
}

if (braces)
    alert('error');
share|improve this answer
if (expression1.match(/\(/g).length === expression2.match(/\)/g).length) {
    // is equal
}

In order to make it work with strings containing no braces, you may use the following workaround:

((expression1.match(/\(/g) || []).length
share|improve this answer
    
Note that ))(( is consider true by this code, since only the count is taken into consideration, the order can be any. –  nhahtdh Dec 19 '12 at 10:54
    
@nhahtdh The OP wants to count the number of brackets but not to check the validity. –  VisioN Dec 19 '12 at 10:55
1  
I'm aware of that, just showing an example to make sure the OP really wants this. –  nhahtdh Dec 19 '12 at 10:56

If your goal is to check if an expression is valid (it also means that its substring that contains only brackets forms a correct bracket sequence), then regexps wouldn't help you.

Regular expressions can only handle so called "regular languages" (though JS regexps maybe somewhat more powerful than their theoretic counterparts, but price of it is greater complexity) while language of correct bracket sequences isn't regular.

See that slides — they can give you some glimpse into why regular expressions cannot recongize correct bracket sequence.

Nevertheless, problem isn't so hard. You should just maintain a stack and go over your string from the left to the right. Every time you meet an opening bracket, you push it into the stack. When you meet a closing bracket, you pop top element of the stack and check if its type matches your one (yes, this algorithm can handle brackets of multiple types). At the end you should just check if the stack is empty.

In case you don't need to handle different types of brackets (you have only '(' and ')', for example) you can just maintain a variable openBrackets (essentially it would represent stack's size) and don't let it become negative.

share|improve this answer
    
No, for this problem regex applied in an iterative manner works just fine. See my answer - it is short, fast and accurate. –  ridgerunner May 29 '13 at 13:46
    
@ridgerunner, your approach is out of formal languages theory. In fact, your code is kind of a pushdown automaton and it's quite more powerfull than regexp only. One can parse any programming laguages using regexps to compare strings, but it's totally useless to say that regex works fine in parsing. –  Barmaley.exe May 29 '13 at 14:12

If you only care about the count why don't you try something like this.

if(expression1.split('(').length == expression1.split(')').length) {
  alert('matched');
}
share|improve this answer

Here's another way to do it:

function validParenNesting(text) {
    var re = /\([^()]*\)/g; // Match innermost matching pair.
    // Strip out matching pairs from the inside out.
    while (text.match(re))
        text = text.replace(re, '');
    // If there are any parens left then no good
    if (text.match(/[()]/))
        return false;
    // Otherwise all parens part of matching pair.
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
  1. "I need to match the no of open braces equal to no of close braces using regular expression"

  2. "I need to check for the valid syntax too."

If 2 is true, then 1 is also true. So, look for matches for what you know is valid syntax -- in this case: {}. Execute a loop which removes all valid matches from the "stack" until there are no valid matches left. If what's left at the end is nothing, then it means your argument is 100% valid. If what's left at the end is something -- it means the "remainders" didn't pass your validity test, and are thus invalid:

var foo = function(str) {
    while(str.match(/{}/g))           // loop while matches of "{}" are found
        str = str.replace(/{}/g, ''); // "slices" matches out of the "stack"
    return !str.match(/({|})/g);      // `false` if invalids remain, otherwise `true`
};

foo('{{{}}}'); // true
foo('{{}}}}}}}}}}{}'); // false
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