Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is my code which I use to get string grid from CSV file using CsvFileReader class on this URL

static void Main(string[] args)
{
  // Read sample data from CSV file
  ArrayList list = new ArrayList();
  List<string> U = new List<string>();
  U.Clear();
  list.Clear();
  using (CsvFileReader reader = new CsvFileReader(@"C:\\path_to_file\file.csv"))
  {
    CsvRow row = new CsvRow();
    while (reader.ReadRow(row))
    {
      U.Clear();
      foreach (string s in row)
      {
        //Console.Write(s);
        //Console.Write(" ");
        U.Add(s);
      }
      list.Add(U);
      //Console.WriteLine();
    }
  }

  Console.WriteLine(list);
  Console.ReadLine();
}

However I am not getting the string grid as I want. The 'list' contains only duplicated copies of the last csv row which is equal to the number of rows in CSV file and not the exact grid I am looking for.

share|improve this question
    
See if there is commas in the data, you should use escaping mechanism of CSV files –  Mohamed Sakher Sawan Dec 19 '12 at 11:10
add comment

2 Answers

I do not know what you mean by string "grid", but I guess that you mean a List that will contain List<string>'s for each row of the CSV file.

Your basic error is using the same list (U) for the inner loop over and over again. List<T> is a reference type in C# so you end up adding the exact same object again and again and again.

I haven't tested the code, but something along these lines should work.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
  // Read sample data from CSV file
  List<List<string>> list = new List<List<string>>();
  using (CsvFileReader reader = new CsvFileReader(@"C:\\path_to_file\file.csv"))
  {
    CsvRow row = new CsvRow();
    while (reader.ReadRow(row))
    {
      List<string> rowList = new List<string>();
      foreach (string s in row)
      {
        //Console.Write(s);
        //Console.Write(" ");
        rowList.Add(s);
      }
      list.Add(rowList);
      //Console.WriteLine();
    }
  }

  foreach (List<string> rowList in list)
  {
     foreach (string cellData in rowList)
     {
        Console.Write(cellData + "\t");
     }
     Console.WriteLine();
  }
  Console.ReadLine();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks... this was what i was looking for....had used the wrong concept even for another project ....so will try rectifying it.. –  Brij123 Dec 19 '12 at 12:15
    
As a rule of thumb, it's clearest if you declare and instantiate the variables as near as possible to the place where they are used. –  SWeko Dec 19 '12 at 12:19
add comment

I can provide you a function to read tabulator separated csv into datatable: Save excel to tab separated csv, and you can read it.

    public static DataTable ParseCSV(string path)
    {
        var dt = new DataTable();
        using (var sr = new StreamReader(path, Encoding.UTF8))
        {
            string line;
            while ((line = sr.ReadLine()) != null)
            {
                string[] items = line.Split('\t');
                items[1] = ToUpperFirstLetter(items[1].ToLower());
                if (dt.Columns.Count == 0)
                {
                    // column names
                    foreach (string t in items)
                        dt.Columns.Add(new DataColumn(t.Trim(), typeof(string)));
                }
                else
                {
                    //data
                    dt.Rows.Add(items);
                }
            }
        }
        return dt;
    }

usage:

    var dt = ParseCSV("c:\\data\\some.txt")
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.