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I found this code in The C Answer Book.

int readline(char s[], int lim) {
    int i,c,j=0;
    for(i=0; (c=getchar())!=EOF && c!='\n'; ++i) {
        if(i<lim-2) {
            s[j]=c;
            ++j;
        }
    }
    if(c=='\n') {
        s[j]=c;
        ++j;
        ++i;
    }
    s[j]='\0';
    return i;
}

I wrote my version :

int readline(char line[], int lim) {
    int c, i;
    for(i=0; (c=getchar())!=EOF && c!='\n'; ++i) {
        if(i<lim-2) {
            line[i]=c;
        }
    }
    if(c=='\n') {
        line[i]=c;
        ++i;
    }
    line[i]='\0';
    return  i;
}

I have used only one variable 'i' as counter but the original version has used two variable 'i' and 'j' as counters. What is the difference between the two?

Please tell me how do they differ?

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The second version of the function leaves part of line uninitialised and risks writing the final '\n', '\0' beyond the end of the line buffer in cases where the initial loop continues beyond i<lim-2

share|improve this answer

If the user inputs more than lim-2 characters, the first version works correctly, and the second writes past the end of line:

if(c=='\n') {
    line[i]=c;  <<=== here
    ++i;
}
line[i]='\0';   <<=== and here 

This doesn't mean you actually need two variables. You can use one, but you must cap it after the loop. Do whatever you think makes the code is easier to read.

share|improve this answer
    
How do I 'cap' the variable? – ShuklaSannidhya Dec 19 '12 at 11:38
2  
@SandyLee_user53167: See if it's greater than the max value and, if it is, set it to that max value. – NPE Dec 19 '12 at 11:47

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