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Sometimes I find myself writing tail recursive functions. I have been searching high and low, and I have found there is tail recursion in the .NET framework, but I'm not sure in what cases I can, and in what cases I can't use tail recursion efficiently. For example, I have a simple tree, lets call it

public class Tree
{
  public Tree parent = null;

  public Tree(Tree parent)
  {
    this.parent = parent;
    this.children = new List<Tree>();
  }

  public List<Tree> children {get; private set;}

  public Tree root
  {
    get
    {
      return this.parent == null ? this : parent.root;
    }
  }
}

for the root property, will the compiler emit a loop? will it emit .tail? Will the jitter respect the .tail? will nothing fancy happen, and will the algorithm just run recursively? Most importantly, should I rewrite this to be iterative?

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4  
Well, my question for you is: have you measured it? –  Jon Limjap Dec 19 '12 at 11:29
    
To receive good votes on question, please attach some results of your research effort. Can you write and time those cases you mentioned? –  Peter Ivan Dec 19 '12 at 11:32
    
I was hoping someone know the answer. I'm unfamilliar with the disassembler myself, and since this specific case hinges on debug or release versioning and I have no idea how this affects or might affect the JIT or the bytecode, and that if this is a JIT effect, it will be very hard to measure effectively I feared if I tried to measure it, I might draw the wrong conclusions. –  Martijn Dec 19 '12 at 11:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The C# compiler will never emit tail prefix.

F# will do so, if the call is in tail position. It depends on the order you traverse the tree whether tail recursion is applicable.

In your code, there is nothing in a tail position. The reason is the usage of a ternary operator. If the code is rewritten to use if statements with each branch returning, then the call to parent.root will be in tail position.

In terms of optimization, the compiler (F# or IronScheme) will normally convert tail recursive calls into while (true) { ... } loops. This is done as it removes both the tail call and the need to call the method again.

So if C# was allowed to emit tail calls (which it is not) it would likely be transformed from:

public Tree root
{
  get
  {
    if (parent == null) return this;
    else return parent.root; // now in tail position
  }
}

to (just a guestimate)

public Tree root
{
  get
  {
    Tree temp = this;
    while (true)
    {
      if (temp.parent == null)
      {
         return temp;
      }
      temp = temp.parent;
    }
  }
}

F# and IronScheme both does the same transformation. This is called tail call elimination (TCE). And yes, it will be marginally faster than the C# version. (I have tested this by microbenchmarking fib on C#, F# and IronScheme)

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Can you add some documentation reference? –  Peter Ivan Dec 19 '12 at 11:36
    
It's been added to C# blogs.msdn.com/b/clrcodegeneration/archive/2009/05/11/… –  Dave Bish Dec 19 '12 at 11:37
1  
So may I conclude: "There is no tail call elimination, loop by hand to avoid running out of stack space (and if there were, the ternary operator in my example ruins it anyway)"? –  Martijn Dec 19 '12 at 12:45
6  
That is close enough to correct for practical purposes. Yes, the C# compiler never emits the tail prefix, however, it is legal for the jitter to realize that a method can be made tail recursive even without the prefix. The x86 32 bit jitter never does so but the 64 bit jitter occasionally will make a C# method tail recursive for you, which is somewhat surprising. –  Eric Lippert Dec 19 '12 at 15:21
2  
as I would much fancy this, I opened a uservoice on this one: visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-visual-studio/… –  Martijn Dec 19 '12 at 23:10

There is similar answer other answer.

Regarding speed. Tail recursion optimization isn't really different from loop for small functions. When tail call optimization fired it just replace "call" instruction (on x86) with "jmp". When doing the same through loop you'll have the same "jmp" instruction for entering next cycle. One moment you should remember is that the whole body of function will be the body of cycle and thus you should try to minimize size of recursive functions.

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Note: It is not called tail call optimization, but rather tail call elimination. :) –  leppie Dec 19 '12 at 12:31
    
@leppie, I don't think that the only that term is applicable (see wiki). I know that moment from Haskell and mono --optimize=tailc. Using that rule you can call loop rewind optimization as a in loop explicit cmp elimination ;) –  ony Dec 20 '12 at 8:44
    
The wiki says both are the same... TCO just sounds functionally and semantically wrong. –  leppie Dec 20 '12 at 8:52

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