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My requirement is my text box should not accept the script tags(i.e < and >). When I open the page first time my text box does not allow script tags(i.e < and >).

After some time it allows only alphanumeric characters. When I refresh the page it works fine. Can any one help this. how can i get solution for this? or is there any easy way for this.

my code:

<input name="headerTextBoxs" id="headerTextBox" size="55" type="text" onKeypress="return keyRestricted(event)", onKeydown="return keyRestricted(event)" value="" />

<script type="text/javascript">
    function keyRestricted(evt) {
        var theEvent = evt || window.event;
        var key = theEvent.keyCode || theEvent.which;

        var keychar = String.fromCharCode(key);
        //alert(keychar);
        var keycheck = /[a-zA-Z0-9]/;

        if ( (key == 60 || key == 62)) // not allowing script tags
        {

            if (!keycheck.test(keychar)) {
                theEvent.returnValue =false ; //for IE
                if (theEvent.preventDefault) theEvent.preventDefault(); //Firefox

            }
        }
    }

</script>

Another way: My requirement is same that is not allow script tags(i.e < and >). Here the problem is it works fine in mozilla firefox. but in google cromo and IE browsers my textbox not allowing backwards text (i.e left arrow(<-)). simply i wrote like this.
My code:

<input name="headerTextBoxs" id="headerTextBox" size="55" type="text" onkeyup = "this.value=this.value.replace(/[<>]/g,'');" />

share|improve this question
    
try putting a alert() right at the start of the function to check it starts at least. –  Naryl Dec 19 '12 at 11:43
    
@Naryl at least read what the user wrote. –  mkey Dec 19 '12 at 11:56
    
I did, what's wrong with my question? He said it takes a refresh for the function to work properly, I only suggested to add a alert to see what is the function doing... –  Naryl Dec 19 '12 at 12:00
    
You so obviously haven't been reading and now you're just beating a dead donkey. The user said "After some time it allows only alphanumeric characters." which obviously means the function is being called. What else but js would prevent the input box from showing anything but alphanumeric characters? –  mkey Dec 19 '12 at 12:06

3 Answers 3

This works OK for me.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <script>
            function keyRestricted(e) {
                e= e|| window.event;
                var key= e.keyCode || e.which;

                var keychar= String.fromCharCode(key);
                var keycheck = /[a-zA-Z0-9]/;

                if ((key == 60 || key == 62)){
                    if (!keycheck.test(keychar)) {
                        e.returnValue =false ;
                        if (e.preventDefault) e.preventDefault();
                    }
                }
            }
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <input size="55" type="text" onKeypress="keyRestricted(event);" value="" />
    </body>
<html>
share|improve this answer
    
Another way: <input name="headerTextBoxs" id="headerTextBox" size="55" type="text" onkeyup = "this.value=this.value.replace(/[<>]/g,'');" /> i written like this. here problem is backwards text(i.e left arrow) is not allowing in google cromo and IE browsers. In mozilla firefox it works fine. –  Ram Dec 20 '12 at 5:47
    
@Ram I think it's better to not allow input then to overwrite. –  mkey Dec 20 '12 at 13:04

I would use the change event to do this.

<input type="text" name="name" onchange="validate(this);"/>

function validate(input_element) {
    if( /(<|>)/.test( input_element.value ) ) {
        alert( "< and > are not allowed characters" );
    }
}

This has less of an impact on performance and you can also use the validate function later on if necessary.

Demo here

share|improve this answer

Try onkeyup event only if you want to be it more or less responsive.

onchage event will occur when you will focus out the <input>, so it will be kinda post factum.

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