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I am processing a TreeView of directories and files, users can select either a file, or a directory and then do something with it. This requires me to have a method which performs different actions if they have selected a file, or a directory.

At the moment I am doing something like this to determine if the path is a file or a directory:

bool bIsFile = false;
bool bIsDirectory = false;

try
{
    string[] subfolders = Directory.GetDirectories(strFilePath);

    bIsDirectory = true;
    bIsFile = false;
}
catch(System.IO.IOException)
{
    bIsFolder = false;
    bIsFile = true;
}

I cannot help to feel that there is a better way to do this! But I cannot find any .Net methods which I can ask "Is this path a directory or a file ?".

Any suggestions ?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
3  
Can someone edit the question title to specify "existing" file/directory? All of the answers apply to a path for a file/directory that is on disk. –  jberger Jun 4 '12 at 15:15
    
@jberger please refer to my answer below. I found a way to accomplish this for paths of files/folders which may or may not exist. –  lhan Oct 18 '12 at 15:52
    
possible duplicate of .NET How to check if path is a file and not a directory? –  nawfal Jun 12 '13 at 12:03
    
How are you populating this treeview? How are you getting the path out of it? –  Random832 Dec 22 '13 at 0:14

15 Answers 15

up vote 260 down vote accepted

From How to tell if path is file or directory:

// get the file attributes for file or directory
FileAttributes attr = File.GetAttributes(@"c:\Temp");

//detect whether its a directory or file
if ((attr & FileAttributes.Directory) == FileAttributes.Directory)
    MessageBox.Show("Its a directory");
else
    MessageBox.Show("Its a file");

Update for .NET 4.0+

Per the comments below, if you are on .NET 4.0 or later (and maximum performance is not critical) you can write the code in a cleaner way:

if (attr.HasFlag(FileAttributes.Directory))
    MessageBox.Show("Its a directory");
else
    MessageBox.Show("Its a file");
share|improve this answer
5  
+1 This is the better approach and is significantly faster than the solution I have proposed. –  Andrew Hare Sep 8 '09 at 18:22
27  
does NOT work for paths to non-existent files/folders –  jberger May 31 '12 at 15:30
4  
@KeyMs92 Its bitwise math. Basically, attr is some binary value with one bit meaning "this is a directory". The bitwise and & operator will return a binary value where only the bits that are on (1) in both the operands are turned on. In this case doing a bitwise and operation against attr and the FileAttributes.Directory value will return the value of FileAttributes.Directory if the Directory file attribute bit is turned on. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitwise_operation for a better explanation. –  Kyle Trauberman Aug 30 '12 at 21:28
20  
@Key: After .NET 4.0, attr.HasFlag(FileAttributes.Directory) can be used instead. –  Şafak Gür May 15 '13 at 9:56
5  
@ŞafakGür: Don't do this inside a time sensitive loop. attr.HasFlag() is slow as hell and uses Reflection for each call –  springy76 May 17 '13 at 9:29

How about using these?

File.Exists();
Directory.Exists();
share|improve this answer
14  
This also has the advantage of not throwing an exception on an invalid path, unlike File.GetAttributes(). –  Deanna Dec 16 '11 at 10:32
    
I use Long Path library from BCL bcl.codeplex.com/… in my project so there's no way to get file attributes but calling Exist is a nice workaround. –  Puterdo Borato Feb 27 '12 at 9:23
2  
@jberger I would expect it to NOT work for paths to non-existent files/folders. File.Exists("c:\\temp\\nonexistant.txt") should return false, as it does. –  michaelkoss Jun 4 '12 at 14:27
4  
+1 for the better answer.. –  nawfal Jun 13 '13 at 4:27
3  
If you are worried about non-existent files/folders try this public static bool? IsDirectory(string path){ if (Directory.Exists(path)) return true; // is a directory else if (File.Exists(path)) return false; // is a file else return null; // is a nothing } –  Dustin Townsend Jun 26 '14 at 13:34

With only this line you can get if a path is a directory or a file:

File.GetAttributes(data.Path).HasFlag(FileAttributes.Directory)
share|improve this answer
    
Mind you need at least .NET 4.0 for this. Also this will explode if path is not a valid path. –  nawfal Jun 21 '13 at 7:48

The most accurate approach is going to be using some interop code from the shlwapi.dll

[DllImport(SHLWAPI, CharSet = CharSet.Unicode)]
[return: MarshalAsAttribute(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
[ResourceExposure(ResourceScope.None)]
internal static extern bool PathIsDirectory([MarshalAsAttribute(UnmanagedType.LPWStr), In] string pszPath);

You would then call it like this:

#region IsDirectory
/// <summary>
/// Verifies that a path is a valid directory.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="path">The path to verify.</param>
/// <returns><see langword="true"/> if the path is a valid directory; 
/// otherwise, <see langword="false"/>.</returns>
/// <exception cref="T:System.ArgumentNullException">
/// <para><paramref name="path"/> is <see langword="null"/>.</para>
/// </exception>
/// <exception cref="T:System.ArgumentException">
/// <para><paramref name="path"/> is <see cref="F:System.String.Empty">String.Empty</see>.</para>
/// </exception>
public static bool IsDirectory(string path)
{
    return PathIsDirectory(path);
}
share|improve this answer
16  
Ugly. I hate interop to do these simple tasks. And it's not portable. and it's ugly. Did I say that it's ugly? :) –  Ignacio Soler Garcia Nov 14 '11 at 14:15
2  
@SoMoS It may be "ugly" in your opinion, but it is still the most accurate approach. Yes, it's not a portable solution but that wasn't what the question asked. –  Scott Dorman Nov 15 '11 at 14:37
4  
What do you mean exactly with accurate? It gives the same results as the answer from Quinn Wilson and required interop which breaks portability. To me its as accurate as the other solutions and have side effects others don't. –  Ignacio Soler Garcia Nov 17 '11 at 10:07
    
It does not work with non-existing files or directories. –  Ray Cheng Dec 26 '14 at 21:52
2  
There's a Framework API to do this. Using Interop is not the way to go. –  TomXP411 Feb 26 at 0:50

As an alternative to Directory.Exists(), you can use the File.GetAttributes() method to get the attributes of a file or a directory, so you could create a helper method like this:

private static bool IsDirectory(string path)
{
    System.IO.FileAttributes fa = System.IO.File.GetAttributes(path);
    bool isDirectory = false;
    if ((fa & FileAttributes.Directory) != 0)
    {
        isDirectory = true;
    }
    return isDirectory;
}

You could also consider adding an object to the tag property of the TreeView control when populating the control that contains additional metadata for the item. For instance, you could add a FileInfo object for files and a DirectoryInfo object for directories and then test for the item type in the tag property to save making additional system calls to get that data when clicking on the item.

share|improve this answer
    
how is this different than the other answer –  jberger May 31 '12 at 15:33
4  
Rather than that horrible block of logic, try isDirectory = (fa & FileAttributes.Directory) != 0); –  Immortal Blue Feb 15 '13 at 20:55

I came across this when facing a similar problem, except I needed to check if a path is for a file or folder when that file or folder may not actually exist. There were a few comments on answers above that mentioned they would not work for this scenario. I found a solution (I use VB.NET, but you can convert if you need) that seems to work well for me:

Dim path As String = "myFakeFolder\ThisDoesNotExist\"
Dim bIsFolder As Boolean = (IO.Path.GetExtension(path) = "")
'returns True

Dim path As String = "myFakeFolder\ThisDoesNotExist\File.jpg"
Dim bIsFolder As Boolean = (IO.Path.GetExtension(path) = "")
'returns False

Hopefully this can be helpful to someone!

share|improve this answer
1  
have you tried the Path.HasExtension method? –  jberger Nov 3 '12 at 19:17
    
Nope, I haven't but I assume it would work just the same! –  lhan Nov 3 '12 at 22:05
    
If it doesn't exist, then it's not a file or a directory. Any name can be created as either. If you intend to create it, then you should know what you're creating, and if you don't, then why could you possibly need this information? –  Random832 Dec 22 '13 at 0:13
1  
A folder can be named test.txt and a file can be named test - in these cases your code would return incorrect results –  Stephan Bauer Aug 22 '14 at 9:38
    
There's a .Exists method in the System.IO.FIle and System.IO.Directory classes. that's the thing to do. Directories can have extensions; I see it frequently. –  TomXP411 Feb 26 at 0:57

This was the best I could come up with given the behavior of the Exists and Attributes properties:

using System.IO;

public static class FileSystemInfoExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Checks whether a FileInfo or DirectoryInfo object is a directory, or intended to be a directory.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="fileSystemInfo"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static bool IsDirectory(this FileSystemInfo fileSystemInfo)
    {
        if (fileSystemInfo == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        if ((int)fileSystemInfo.Attributes != -1)
        {
            // if attributes are initialized check the directory flag
            return fileSystemInfo.Attributes.HasFlag(FileAttributes.Directory);
        }

        // If we get here the file probably doesn't exist yet.  The best we can do is 
        // try to judge intent.  Because directories can have extensions and files
        // can lack them, we can't rely on filename.
        // 
        // We can reasonably assume that if the path doesn't exist yet and 
        // FileSystemInfo is a DirectoryInfo, a directory is intended.  FileInfo can 
        // make a directory, but it would be a bizarre code path.

        return fileSystemInfo is DirectoryInfo;
    }
}

Here's how it tests out:

    [TestMethod]
    public void IsDirectoryTest()
    {
        // non-existing file, FileAttributes not conclusive, rely on type of FileSystemInfo
        const string nonExistentFile = @"C:\TotallyFakeFile.exe";

        var nonExistentFileDirectoryInfo = new DirectoryInfo(nonExistentFile);
        Assert.IsTrue(nonExistentFileDirectoryInfo.IsDirectory());

        var nonExistentFileFileInfo = new FileInfo(nonExistentFile);
        Assert.IsFalse(nonExistentFileFileInfo.IsDirectory());

        // non-existing directory, FileAttributes not conclusive, rely on type of FileSystemInfo
        const string nonExistentDirectory = @"C:\FakeDirectory";

        var nonExistentDirectoryInfo = new DirectoryInfo(nonExistentDirectory);
        Assert.IsTrue(nonExistentDirectoryInfo.IsDirectory());

        var nonExistentFileInfo = new FileInfo(nonExistentDirectory);
        Assert.IsFalse(nonExistentFileInfo.IsDirectory());

        // Existing, rely on FileAttributes
        const string existingDirectory = @"C:\Windows";

        var existingDirectoryInfo = new DirectoryInfo(existingDirectory);
        Assert.IsTrue(existingDirectoryInfo.IsDirectory());

        var existingDirectoryFileInfo = new FileInfo(existingDirectory);
        Assert.IsTrue(existingDirectoryFileInfo.IsDirectory());

        // Existing, rely on FileAttributes
        const string existingFile = @"C:\Windows\notepad.exe";

        var existingFileDirectoryInfo = new DirectoryInfo(existingFile);
        Assert.IsFalse(existingFileDirectoryInfo.IsDirectory());

        var existingFileFileInfo = new FileInfo(existingFile);
        Assert.IsFalse(existingFileFileInfo.IsDirectory());
    }
share|improve this answer

I use the following, it also tests the extension which means it can be used for testing if the path supplied is a file but a file that doesn't exist.

private static bool isDirectory(string path)
{
    bool result = true;
    System.IO.FileInfo fileTest = new System.IO.FileInfo(path);
    if (fileTest.Exists == true)
    {
        result = false;
    }
    else
    {
        if (fileTest.Extension != "")
        {
            result = false;
        }
    }
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
FileInfo Extension is (IMAO) a good option to check on non-existent paths –  dataCore Mar 21 '13 at 13:27
    
your second condition (else) is smelly. if it is not an existing file then you dont know what it could possibly be (directories can end with something like ".txt" too). –  nawfal Jun 13 '13 at 4:35

Here's what we use:

using System;

using System.IO;

namespace crmachine.CommonClasses
{

  public static class CRMPath
  {

    public static bool IsDirectory(string path)
    {
      if (path == null)
      {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("path");
      }

      string reason;
      if (!IsValidPathString(path, out reason))
      {
        throw new ArgumentException(reason);
      }

      if (!(Directory.Exists(path) || File.Exists(path)))
      {
        throw new InvalidOperationException(string.Format("Could not find a part of the path '{0}'",path));
      }

      return (new System.IO.FileInfo(path).Attributes & FileAttributes.Directory) == FileAttributes.Directory;
    } 

    public static bool IsValidPathString(string pathStringToTest, out string reasonForError)
    {
      reasonForError = "";
      if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(pathStringToTest))
      {
        reasonForError = "Path is Null or Whitespace.";
        return false;
      }
      if (pathStringToTest.Length > CRMConst.MAXPATH) // MAXPATH == 260
      {
        reasonForError = "Length of path exceeds MAXPATH.";
        return false;
      }
      if (PathContainsInvalidCharacters(pathStringToTest))
      {
        reasonForError = "Path contains invalid path characters.";
        return false;
      }
      if (pathStringToTest == ":")
      {
        reasonForError = "Path consists of only a volume designator.";
        return false;
      }
      if (pathStringToTest[0] == ':')
      {
        reasonForError = "Path begins with a volume designator.";
        return false;
      }

      if (pathStringToTest.Contains(":") && pathStringToTest.IndexOf(':') != 1)
      {
        reasonForError = "Path contains a volume designator that is not part of a drive label.";
        return false;
      }
      return true;
    }

    public static bool PathContainsInvalidCharacters(string path)
    {
      if (path == null)
      {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("path");
      }

      bool containedInvalidCharacters = false;

      for (int i = 0; i < path.Length; i++)
      {
        int n = path[i];
        if (
            (n == 0x22) || // "
            (n == 0x3c) || // <
            (n == 0x3e) || // >
            (n == 0x7c) || // |
            (n  < 0x20)    // the control characters
          )
        {
          containedInvalidCharacters = true;
        }
      }

      return containedInvalidCharacters;
    }


    public static bool FilenameContainsInvalidCharacters(string filename)
    {
      if (filename == null)
      {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("filename");
      }

      bool containedInvalidCharacters = false;

      for (int i = 0; i < filename.Length; i++)
      {
        int n = filename[i];
        if (
            (n == 0x22) || // "
            (n == 0x3c) || // <
            (n == 0x3e) || // >
            (n == 0x7c) || // |
            (n == 0x3a) || // : 
            (n == 0x2a) || // * 
            (n == 0x3f) || // ? 
            (n == 0x5c) || // \ 
            (n == 0x2f) || // /
            (n  < 0x20)    // the control characters
          )
        {
          containedInvalidCharacters = true;
        }
      }

      return containedInvalidCharacters;
    }

  }

}
share|improve this answer

soooo late in the game i know, but thought i'd share this anyway. If you are solely working with the paths as strings, figuring this out is easy as pie:

private bool IsFolder(string ThePath)
{
    string BS = Path.DirectorySeparatorChar.ToString();
    return Path.GetDirectoryName(ThePath) == ThePath.TrimEnd(BS.ToCharArray());
}

for example: ThePath == "C:\SomeFolder\File1.txt" would end up being this:

return "C:\SomeFolder" == "C:\SomeFolder\File1.txt" (FALSE)

Another example: ThePath == "C:\SomeFolder\" would end up being this:

return "C:\SomeFolder" == "C:\SomeFolder" (TRUE)

And this would also work without the trailing backslash: ThePath == "C:\SomeFolder" would end up being this:

return "C:\SomeFolder" == "C:\SomeFolder" (TRUE)

Keep in mind here that this only works with the paths themselves, and not the relationship between the path and the "physical disk"... so it can't tell you if the path/file exists or anything like that, but it sure can tell you if the path is a folder or a file...

share|improve this answer
1  
Does not work with System.IO.FileSystemWatcher since when a directory is deleted it sends c:\my_directory as an argument which is the same when a extension less file c:\my_directory is deleted. –  Ray Cheng Dec 26 '14 at 21:13
    
GetDirectoryName('C:\SomeFolder') returns 'C:\', so your last case doesn't work. This doesn't distinguish between directories and files with no extensions. –  Lucy Jul 7 at 20:45

If you want to find directories, including those that are marked "hidden" and "system", try this (requires .NET V4):

FileAttributes fa = File.GetAttributes(path);
if(fa.HasFlag(FileAttributes.Directory)) 
share|improve this answer

Here's mine:

    bool IsPathDirectory(string path)
    {
        if (path == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("path");
        path = path.Trim();

        if (Directory.Exists(path)) 
            return true;

        if (File.Exists(path)) 
            return false;

        // neither file nor directory exists. guess intention

        // if has trailing slash then it's a directory
        if (new[] {"\\", "/"}.Any(x => path.EndsWith(x)))
            return true; // ends with slash

        // if has extension then its a file; directory otherwise
        return string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(Path.GetExtension(path));
    }

It's similar to others' answers but not exactly the same.

share|improve this answer
using System;
using System.IO;
namespace FileOrDirectory
{
     class Program
     {
          public static string FileOrDirectory(string path)
          {
               if (File.Exists(path))
                    return "File";
               if (Directory.Exists(path))
                    return "Directory";
               return "Path Not Exists";
          }
          static void Main()
          {
               Console.WriteLine("Enter The Path:");
               string path = Console.ReadLine();
               Console.WriteLine(FileOrDirectory(path));
          }
     }
}
share|improve this answer

I needed this, the posts helped, this gets it down to one line, and if the path isn't a path at all, it just returns and exits the method. It addresses all of the above concerns, doesn't need the trailing slash either.

if (!Directory.Exists(@"C:\folderName")) return;
share|improve this answer

Using the selected answer on this post, I looked at the comments and give credence to @ŞafakGür, @Anthony and @Quinn Wilson for their info bits that lead me to this improved answer which I wrote and tested:

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns true if the path is a dir, false if it's a file and null if it's neither or doesn't exist.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="path"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static bool? IsDirFile(this string path)
    {
        bool? result = null;

        if(Directory.Exists(path) || File.Exists(path))
        {
            // get the file attributes for file or directory
            var fileAttr = File.GetAttributes(path);

            if (fileAttr.HasFlag(FileAttributes.Directory))
                result = true;
            else
                result = false;
        }

        return result;
    }
share|improve this answer

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