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I want replace the String TaskID_1 with a sequence starting from 1001 and this TaskID_1 can exists any many number of lines in my input file. Similarly i need to replace all occurrences of TASKID_2 in my input file with next sequence value 1002.

Input file:

12345|45345|TaskID_1|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
1245|425345|TaskID_1|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
1234|25345|TaskID_2|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
123425|65345|TaskID_2|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
123425|15325|TaskID_1|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
11345|55315|TaskID_2|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
6345|15345|TaskID_3|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
72345|25345|TaskID_4|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
9345|411345|TaskID_3|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12

The output file should look like:

12345|45345|1001|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
1245|425345|1001|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
1234|25345|1002|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
123425|65345|1002|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
123425|15325|1001|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
11345|55315|1002|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
6345|15345|1003|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
72345|25345|1004|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
9345|411345|1003|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Here's one way using awk:

awk 'BEGIN { FS=OFS="|" } { $3=1000 + NR }1' file

Or less verbosely:

awk -F '|' '{ $3=1000 + NR }1' OFS='|' file

Results:

12345|45345|1001|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
1245|425345|1002|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
1234|25345|1003|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
123425|65345|1004|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
123425|15325|1005|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
11345|55315|1006|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
6345|15345|1007|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
72345|25345|1008|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
9345|411345|1009|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12

For the first example, the file separator and output file separator are set to a single pipe character. This is set in the BEGIN block, so that it is executed only once, and not on every line of input. We then set the third column to be equal to 1000 plus an incrementing variable. We could use ++i as this variable, but we could instead use NR (which is short for record number/line number) and this would therefore avoid the need to create an extra variable. The 1 on the end enables printing by default. A more verbose solution would look like:

awk 'BEGIN { FS=OFS="|" } { $3=1000 + NR; print }' file

EDIT:

Using the updated data file, try:

awk 'BEGIN { FS=OFS="|" } { sub(/.*_/,"",$3); $3+=1000 }1' file

Results:

12345|45345|1001|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
1245|425345|1001|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
1234|25345|1002|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
123425|65345|1002|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
123425|15325|1001|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
11345|55315|1002|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
6345|15345|1003|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
72345|25345|1004|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
9345|411345|1003|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
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1  
+1 ... yup, that's just about exactly how I'd do it. –  ghoti Dec 19 '12 at 12:30
1  
+1 darn, beat me to it (the last solution above, that is) :-). –  Ed Morton Dec 19 '12 at 14:00
1  
Thanks Steve.. This solution is works great. –  Ramkumar Dec 20 '12 at 6:17
    
Time for a file with 1M lines: 5.394 seconds. –  erik Jan 31 '13 at 11:08

I can't come up with a better solution than the one steve suggested in awk.

So here's a worse solution, using only bash.

#!/bin/bash

IFS='|'

while read f1 f2 f3 f4 f5 f6; do
    printf '%s|%s|%d|%s|%s|%s\n' "$f1" "$f2" "$((${f3#*_}+1000))" "$f4" "$f5" "$f6"
done < input

It's "worse" only because it'll be much slower than awk, which is fast and efficient with this sort of problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Time for a file with 1M lines: 66 seconds. Very slow, but still ok to use and easy to understand. –  erik Jan 31 '13 at 11:20
    
If you replace $((++n)) by $((${f3#*_}+1000)) then it is what the question wanted. And the time I measured was for the corrected version. –  erik Jan 31 '13 at 11:35
    
Oh, and you have to replace f1 f2 _ f4 f5 f6 by f1 f2 f3 f4 f5 f6. –  erik Jan 31 '13 at 11:43
    
@erik - right you are, I missed the relationship between TaskID when I answered this last year. I've updated my answer with your fix. Thanks. –  ghoti Jan 31 '13 at 16:05
perl -F"\|" -lane '$F[2]=~s/.*_/100/g;print join("|",@F)' your_file

Tested Below:

> cat temp
12345|45345|TaskID_1|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
1245|425345|TaskID_1|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
1234|25345|TaskID_2|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
123425|65345|TaskID_2|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
123425|15325|TaskID_1|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
11345|55315|TaskID_2|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
6345|15345|TaskID_3|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
72345|25345|TaskID_4|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
9345|411345|TaskID_3|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
> perl -F"\|" -lane '$F[2]=~s/.*_/100/g;print join("|",@F)' temp
12345|45345|1001|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
1245|425345|1001|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
1234|25345|1002|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
123425|65345|1002|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
123425|15325|1001|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
11345|55315|1002|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
6345|15345|1003|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
72345|25345|1004|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
9345|411345|1003|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
> 
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Time for a file with 1M lines: 7.463 seconds. Slowest (except bash), and only for 1000 to 1009. –  erik Jan 31 '13 at 11:12

Replace TaskID_ with 100, this is super easy with sed for single digit IDs:

$ sed 's/TaskID_/100/' file
12345|45345|1001|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
1245|425345|1001|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
1234|25345|1002|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
123425|65345|1002|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
123425|15325|1001|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
11345|55315|1002|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
6345|15345|1003|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
72345|25345|1004|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12
9345|411345|1003|dksj|kdjfdsjf|12

To store this change back to the file use the -i option:

sed -i 's/TaskID_/100/' file

Note: this works for TaskID_[0-9] if you want TaskID_23 mapped to 1023 then this won't, this would map TaskID_23 to 10023.

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1  
Time for a file with 1M lines: 0.861 seconds. Fastest, but only for 1000 to 1009. –  erik Jan 31 '13 at 11:04
    
@erik good work, I found your benchmarking very interesting. –  iiSeymour Jan 31 '13 at 11:33

A Perl solution using Steve's logic of adding 1000:

perl -pne 's/TaskID_(\d+)/$1+1000/e;' file

This replaces the 'TaskID_n' with 1000+n. 'e' is used to evaluate the replacement.

share|improve this answer
    
Time for a file with 1M lines: 6.363 seconds. A bit slower than awk but easier to understand if you know regular expressions. –  erik Jan 31 '13 at 11:06

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