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Imagine the following code:

static char myFlag;

void setFlagTo_1(void)
{
  myFlag = 1;
}

char hasFlagChangedTo_1(void)
{
  char retval = myFlag;

  myFlag = 0;

  return retval;
}

How would one describe the function named hasFlagChangedTo_1. How would you call/describe this action?

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closed as not constructive by mah, Mike, Rory McCrossan, Linger, Daij-Djan Dec 19 '12 at 14:27

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I'm not sure I follow... do you want to automatically have the function called when the value of myFlag changes? –  Mike Dec 19 '12 at 12:39
    
read_clear or read_reset? –  Alvin Wong Dec 19 '12 at 12:42
    
There are many ways to answer this question -- an attribute that makes the question inappropriate for Stack Overflow. –  mah Dec 19 '12 at 12:42
    
This question more belongs to programmers.stackexchange.com –  Seki Dec 19 '12 at 13:01
    
The function can be described more clearly by understanding the context in which it is used/called. Depends on the application you are developing. –  Manav Dec 19 '12 at 13:37
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would call it testAndClear analog to that testAndSet-functions...

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I would write it like this:

void clearFlag(char *oldValue)
{
    if (oldValue)
        *oldValue = myFlag;
    myFlag = 0;
}

When you call the function you can pass NULL. But if you pass a pointer to a variable, you can name that variable such that the code at the call site makes it obvious what is going on.

clearFlag(&oldValue);

The problem with using a function that returns a value is that you typically name those functions with the name of the value that is returned. But if the function has a strong side effect, that won't be captured in the name.

When there are side effects, it is often a good idea to use a void function and a name that describes the side-effects.

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I would call such a function retrieveFlag.

When it's there, you retrieve it, so afterwards it isn't there anymore. When it isn't there, it returns false.

Edit: Or just call it getAndResetFlag - does exactly what it says on the tin.

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ResetFlag , As it is resetting the flag value

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