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I would like to read the content of a java Collection in a multi-threaded way. There have been a lot of questions here with the same context, but none on the specific read point.

I have a collection of integer. I just want several threads to iterate over it, each thread pulling one integer at a time. I want to make sure all the collection is iterated, and that no integer is pulled twice by two different threads.

Frankly, I do not know what works. I know that Iterators are not thread-safe, but when it comes to read only I do not know. I did some test to try and get thread faults, but did not reach 100% certainty:

int imax = 500;
Collection<Integer> li = new ArrayList<Integer>(imax);
for (int i = 0; i < imax; i++) {
    li.add(i);
}
final Iterator<Integer> it = li.iterator();

Thread[] threads = new Thread[20];
for (int i = 0; i < threads.length; i++) {
    threads[i] = new Thread("Thread " + i) {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            while(it.hasNext()) {
                System.out.println(it.next());
            }
        }
    };
}

for (int ithread = 0; ithread < threads.length; ++ithread) {
threads[ithread].setPriority(Thread.NORM_PRIORITY);
    threads[ithread].start();
}
try {
    for (int ithread = 0; ithread < threads.length; ++ithread)
    threads[ithread].join();
} catch (InterruptedException ie) {
    throw new RuntimeException(ie);
}

EDIT: In the real use-case, each of this integer is used to start an intensive work, such as finding whether it is prime.

The above example pulls the list of integer without duplicates or misses, but I do not know whether it is by chance.

Using a HashSet instead of an ArrayList works as well, but again, it might be by chance.

How do you do in practice if you have a general collection (not necessarily a list) and need to pull its content in multithreaded fashion?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your use case would benefit from using a Queue - there are a few thread safe implementations, for example ArrayBlockingQueue.

Collection<Integer> li = new ArrayList<Integer>(imax);
final BlockingQueue<Integer> queue = new ArrayBlockingQueue<>(li.size(), false, li);

Thread[] threads = new Thread[20];
for (int i = 0; i < threads.length; i++) {
    threads[i] = new Thread("Thread " + i) {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            Integer i;
            while ((i = queue.poll()) != null) {
                System.out.println(i);
            }
        }
    };
}

This is thread safe and each thread can work independently from the others on a piece of the initial collection.

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1  
Thanks! I did not even know about queues. Changed my life! –  Jean-Yves Dec 19 '12 at 13:40

In general the collecting of the contents by iteration doesn't cost enough to do it multithreaded. It is the operation you do with the list after getting the content. So what you should do is this:

  1. Use single threaded to get the contents and divide the workload.
  2. Start several threads/jobs to do the processing, giving them a (large) piece of the workload. Make sure the threads don't use the original list.
  3. use a single thread to combine the results.

If you need to share a collection use a thread safe collection. They can be created by using Collections.synchronized... functions . However keep in mind that this means threads have to wait for eachother and if you don't have a sizable piece of work, that will make your program slower than a single threaded version.

Note that all objects you share amongst threads need to be thread safe (for instance by wrapping all access in synchronized blocks). The best source of information on that is Concurrency in Practise

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It depends on the collection. If no structural change is happening during the read - you can read it concurrently, it is fine. Most collections do NOT change the structure for read or iteration only, so it is OK, but make sure to read the documenation of the collection you are using before doing so.

For example, HashSet javadocs:

Note that this implementation is not synchronized. If multiple threads access a hash set concurrently, and at least one of the threads modifies the set, it must be synchronized externally.

It implies reading from two threads concurrently is just fine, as long as there is no write.


One way to do it is split the data, and let each thread read collection.size()/ numberOfThreads elements.
thread #i will read from collection.size()/numThreads * i to collection.size()/numThreads * (i+1)

(Note special care will be needed to guarantee the last elements are not missed, it can be done by setting the last thread frpm collection.size()/numThreads * i to collection.size(), but it might make the last thread do much more work, and will make you wait for struggling threads).

Another option is using task queue of intervals, and each thread will read elements while the queue is not empty, and reading the elements in the given intervals. The queue will have to be synchronized because it is modified by multiple threads concurrently.

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Ok thanks. So if I recap what you pointed me to, it means that there is no general truth with my unsafe example, and that it will depend on the concrete implementation of Collection ultimately. –  Jean-Yves Dec 19 '12 at 13:04
    
@Jean-Yves: Ultimately, yes. I am not aware of any collection that actually change the structure while reading - but it doesn't mean there is none, and it ultimately depends on the specific instance at hand. –  amit Dec 19 '12 at 13:09

You can use the synchronized versions available from java.util.Collections. Or you can try special data structures in java.util.concurrent (e.g. ConcurrentHashMap).

I'd prefer either of those to rolling my own.

Another thought is to synchronize the entire method if necessary, not just the collection access.

And remember that immutable objects are always thread-safe. You only need to synchronize shared, mutable state.

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Ok. But for your thought: if I synchronize the whole method, I loose the benefit of multi-threading. –  Jean-Yves Dec 19 '12 at 13:03
1  
@Jean-Yves: Not really. I believe the ConcurrentHashMap uses fine grained synchronization and/or readers-writer lock to allow multiple reads at the same time. Could be wrong though. However, there is still a lot of overhead for this synchronization, that can be avoided if you know the specific instance is not changing the state of the collection. –  amit Dec 19 '12 at 13:12

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