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I have to count the digits after the decimal point in a database hosted by a MS Sql Server (2005 or 2008 does not matter), in order to correct some errors made by users. I have the same problem on an Oracle database, but there things are less complicated. Bottom line is on Oracle the select is:

select length( substr(to_char(MY_FIELD), instr(to_char(MY_FILED),'.',1,1)+1, length(to_char(MY_FILED)))) as digits_length
from MY_TABLE

where the filed My_filed is float(38).

On Ms Sql server I try to use:

select LEN(SUBSTRING(CAST(MY_FIELD AS VARCHAR), CHARINDEX('.',CAST(MY_FILED AS VARCHAR),1)+1, LEN(CAST(MY_FIELD AS VARCHAR)))) as digits_length
from MY_TABLE

The problem is that on MS Sql Server, when i cast MY_FIELD as varchar the float number is truncated by only 2 decimals and the count of the digits is wrong. Can someone give me any hints?

Best regards.

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SELECT 
LEN(CAST(REVERSE(SUBSTRING(STR(MY_FIELD, 13, 11), CHARINDEX('.', STR(MY_FIELD, 13, 11)) + 1, 20)) AS decimal)) 
from TABLE
share|improve this answer
    
Just note that for whole numbers it returns 1 instead of expected 0. – user824276 Jan 15 at 11:50
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I have received from my friend a very simple solution which is just great. So I will post the workaround in order to help others in the same position as me.

First, make function:

create FUNCTION dbo.countDigits(@A float) RETURNS tinyint AS
BEGIN
declare @R tinyint
IF @A IS NULL 
   RETURN NULL
set @R = 0
while @A - str(@A, 18 + @R, @r) <> 0
begin
   SET @R = @R + 1
end
RETURN @R
END
GO

Second:

select MY_FIELD,
dbo.countDigits(MY_FIELD) 
from MY_TABLE

Using the function will get you the exact number of digits after the decimal point.

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The first thing is to switch to using CONVERT rather than CAST. The difference is, with CONVERT, you can specify a format code. CAST uses whatever the default format code is:

When expression is float or real, style can be one of the values shown in the following table. Other values are processed as 0.

None of the formats are particularly appealing, but I think the best for you to use would be 2. So it would be:

CONVERT(varchar(25),MY_FIELD,2)

This will, unfortunately, give you the value in scientific notation and always with 16 digits e.g. 1.234567890123456e+000. To get the number of "real" digits, you need to split this number apart, work out the number of digits in the decimal portion, and offset it by the number provided in the exponent.


And, of course, insert usual caveats/warnings about trying to talk about digits when dealing with a number which has a defined binary representation. The number of "digits" of a particular float may vary depending on how it was calculated.

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