Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have some problems reading specific data from a file. The file has 80 characters on the first and second line and an unknown number of characters on the third line. The following is my code:

int main(){
    ifstream myfile;
    char strings[80];
    myfile.open("test.txt");
    /*reads first line of file into strings*/
    cout << "Name: " << strings << endl;
    /*reads second line of file into strings*/
    cout << "Address: " << strings << endl;
    /*reads third line of file into strings*/
    cout << "Handphone: " << strings << endl;
}

How do i do the actions in the comments?

share|improve this question
6  
If you want to read lines, use getline. If you want to read some precise number of bytes, use read. –  David Schwartz Dec 19 '12 at 13:17
    
and use std::string instead to handle the 3rd line. –  nims Dec 19 '12 at 13:18
    
Thousands of duplicates of this by now... –  Kerrek SB Dec 19 '12 at 13:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

char strings[80] can only hold 79 characters. Make it char strings[81]. You can forget about the size altogether if you use std::string.

You can read lines with the std::getline function.

#include <string>

std::string strings;

/*reads first line of file into strings*/
std::getline( myfile, strings );

/*reads second line of file into strings*/
std::getline( myfile, strings );

/*reads third line of file into strings*/
std::getline( myfile, strings );

The code above ignores the information that the first and second lines are 80 chars long (I'm assuming you're reading a line-based file format). You can add an additional check for that if it's important.

share|improve this answer
    
But when i display added cout<<strings<<endl; It displayed nothing, what do i do next? –  Deckdyl Dec 19 '12 at 13:29
    
Perhaps the file was not found or the content is not valid. Check for errors using if( !myfile ) cout << "File error" << endl; after every operation, including myfile.open. –  Alex Dec 19 '12 at 13:36
    
Ok, found the problem in the orginal code... My file path was wrong. Thanks for your help. –  Deckdyl Dec 19 '12 at 13:39

In your case it will be more appropriate to use string rather than char[].

#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main(){
    ifstream myfile;
    //char strings[80];
    string strings;
    myfile.open("test.txt");

    /*reads first line of file into strings*/
    getline(myfile, strings);
    cout << "Name: " << strings << endl;
    /*reads second line of file into strings*/
    getline(myfile, strings);
    cout << "Address: " << strings << endl;
    /*reads third line of file into strings*/
    getline(myfile, strings);
    cout << "Handphone: " << strings << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, thanks a lot. –  Deckdyl Dec 19 '12 at 13:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.