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Let me start with, I am not sure if this is possible. I am learning generics and I have several repositories in my app. I am trying to make an Interface that takes a generic type and converts it to something that all of the repositories can inherit from. Now on to my question.

public interface IRepository<T>
{
    IEnumerable<T> FindAll();
    IEnumerable<T> FindById(int id);
    IEnumerable<T> FindBy<A>(A type);
}

Is it possible to use a generic to determine what to find by?

public IEnumerable<SomeClass> FindBy<A>(A type)
{
    return _context.Set<SomeClass>().Where(x => x. == type); // I was hoping to do x.type and it would use the same variable to search.
}

To clarify a little better I was considering to be a string, int or whatever type I wanted to search for. What I am hoping for is I can say x.something where the something is equal to the variable passed in.

I can set any repository to my dbcontext using the

public IDbSet<TEntity> Set<TEntity>() where TEntity : class
{
    return base.Set<TEntity>();
}

Any Suggestions?

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1  
If A is derived from SomeClass then you can use OfType<A>() –  stevenrcfox Dec 19 '12 at 13:40
    
did you mean find all entities of type A with FindBy<A>? –  Behnam Esmaili Dec 19 '12 at 13:42
    
@BehnamEsmaili No I was thinking that I would pass the type I want to search by: string, int, DateTime etc. And I would then take that and search the database for the passed in type –  Robert Dec 19 '12 at 13:45
    
@Robert, considering your update Trevors answer suits your requirements best, as then you can decide which property of x to compare against –  stevenrcfox Dec 19 '12 at 13:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you use Expression<Func<T, bool>> instead of A like this:

public interface IRepository<T>
{
    ... // other methods
    IEnumerable<T> FindBy(Expression<Func<T, bool>> predicate);
}

You can query the type using linq and specify the query in the code which calls the repository class.

public IEnumerable<SomeClass> FindBy(Expression<Func<SomeClass, bool>> predicate)
{
    return _context.Set<SomeClass>().Where(predicate);
}

And call it like this:

var results = repository.FindBy(x => x.Name == "Foo");

And given that it's a generic expression, you don't have to implement it in each repository, you can have it in the generic base repository.

public IEnumerable<T> FindBy(Expression<Func<T, bool>> predicate)
{
    return _context.Set<T>().Where(predicate);
}
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2  
Personally I like this approach, but many don't. This means the user of the repository needs to know about what expressions are EF safe and which are not, as such this is a leaky abstraction. –  stevenrcfox Dec 19 '12 at 13:52

I use a combination of Interface and Abstract classes to achieve exactly this.

public class RepositoryEntityBase<T> : IRepositoryEntityBase<T>, IRepositoryEF<T> where T : BaseObject
 // 
public RepositoryEntityBase(DbContext context)
    {
        Context = context;
//etc

public interface IRepositoryEntityBase<T> : IRepositoryEvent where T : BaseObject //must be a model class we are exposing in a repository object

{
    OperationStatus Add(T entity);
    OperationStatus Remove(T entity);
    OperationStatus Change(T entity);
   //etc

then the derived classes can a have a few Object specific methods or indeed nothing and just work

public class RepositoryModule : RepositoryEntityBase<Module>, IRepositoryModule{
    public RepositoryModule(DbContext context) : base(context, currentState) {}
}
//etc
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