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I'm currently working on a page and it's almost finished. But there's one thing, that bothers me. I've got a content div (670x400px) with a scrollbar and lots of text and pictures. When I scroll, sometimes the text is cut in halfs and on the edge there is a line half letters left. I've attached an image of what I mean.

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/195/unbenannt1fll.jpg/

What I would like to do now is to put let the edge fade out. I thought of some ideas like putting a white gradient there or transparency or something with jquery and searched several words put I didn't find anything useful and I'm too bad to think of something myself. I hope you can understand my problem and help me maybe.

EDIT:

I've added a (photoshopped) picture of what I would like to create.

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/339/unbenannt1qo.jpg/

share|improve this question
    
Did you want something like this? jsfiddle.net/Morlock0821/d3KSj –  Pedro Estrada Dec 19 '12 at 14:32
    
Kind of but instead of a shadow it should apply a gradient. –  user1915969 Dec 19 '12 at 14:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Apologies for the formatting but here is the relevant css for a background gradient from white to transparent. That should do what you need.

Edit

It's possible do do this without adding a second element by using the :before pseudo-element positioned absolutely within your containing div. This will not work though in IE7. Here's a fiddle to demonstrate

.gradient{
    position:relative;
}

.gradient:before{
position:absolute;
content: " ";
top:0;
width:100%;
height:20px;
z-index:1;
background: -moz-linear-gradient(top,  rgba(255,255,255,1) 0%, rgba(255,255,255,0) 100%); /* FF3.6+ */
background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0%,rgba(255,255,255,1)), color-stop(100%,rgba(255,255,255,0))); /* Chrome,Safari4+ */
background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top,  rgba(255,255,255,1) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 100%); /* Chrome10+,Safari5.1+ */
background: -o-linear-gradient(top,  rgba(255,255,255,1) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 100%); /* Opera 11.10+ */
background: -ms-linear-gradient(top,  rgba(255,255,255,1) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 100%); /* IE10+ */
background: linear-gradient(to bottom,  rgba(255,255,255,1) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 100%); /* W3C */
filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient( startColorstr='#ffffff', endColorstr='#00ffffff',GradientType=0 ); /* IE6-9 */

}
share|improve this answer
    
If I understand it correct, this code should provide a gradient, that's actually already more than i could do, but I need to apply it to a certain area inside my div, let's say 20px, without creating a new one and it should stay there and always apply on the current content there, when someone scrolls down. Is this also possible with this code? –  user1915969 Dec 19 '12 at 14:42
    
I've updated my answer to do what you asked. –  James South Dec 19 '12 at 14:58
    
very nice approach! alas some of the IE bunch, will not be happy with that pseudo element –  Dogoku Dec 19 '12 at 15:03
    
Cheers! I've used a similar technique for adding inner shadows to Google maps before. Since it's really aesthetics it should be possible to do without on IE7. –  James South Dec 19 '12 at 15:06
    
This is actually an even easier way. Is there a possiblity to apply it to the bottom as well? I looked up the after pseudo element, but this seems to apply after the content element. I managed to put it at the bottom of the content using the :before element and margin-top, tough this seems to be quite amateurish. I also need to turn arround the gradient, but I don't get the numbers. –  user1915969 Dec 19 '12 at 15:32

you can easily do that with css3 gradients (and filter fallback for IE 6-9)

live example:

http://jsfiddle.net/kdQ4y/ or http://jsfiddle.net/kdQ4y/1/

Code for gradients generated using http://www.colorzilla.com/gradient-editor/

The html structure

<div class="wrap">
   <div class="top"></div>
   <div class="content">Content here</div>
   <div class="bottom"></div>
</div>

The css (not all of it is necessary)

.wrap{
    margin:40px;
    position:relative;
    padding:10px;
}

.content{
    height:100px;
    overflow-y:scroll;
}​

.top,.bottom {
    height:40px;
    width:100%;
    position:absolute;
    left:0;
    z-index:10;
}

.top{
    top:0;
    background: -moz-linear-gradient(top,  rgba(255,255,255,1) 0%, rgba(255,255,255,0) 100%); /* FF3.6+ */
background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0%,rgba(255,255,255,1)), color-stop(100%,rgba(255,255,255,0))); /* Chrome,Safari4+ */
background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top,  rgba(255,255,255,1) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 100%); /* Chrome10+,Safari5.1+ */
background: -o-linear-gradient(top,  rgba(255,255,255,1) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 100%); /* Opera 11.10+ */
background: -ms-linear-gradient(top,  rgba(255,255,255,1) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 100%); /* IE10+ */
background: linear-gradient(to bottom,  rgba(255,255,255,1) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 100%); /* W3C */
filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient( startColorstr='#ffffff', endColorstr='#00ffffff',GradientType=0 ); /* IE6-9 */

}

.bottom {
    bottom:0;
background: -moz-linear-gradient(top,  rgba(255,255,255,0) 0%, rgba(255,255,255,1) 100%); /* FF3.6+ */
background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0%,rgba(255,255,255,0)), color-stop(100%,rgba(255,255,255,1))); /* Chrome,Safari4+ */
background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top,  rgba(255,255,255,0) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,1) 100%); /* Chrome10+,Safari5.1+ */
background: -o-linear-gradient(top,  rgba(255,255,255,0) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,1) 100%); /* Opera 11.10+ */
background: -ms-linear-gradient(top,  rgba(255,255,255,0) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,1) 100%); /* IE10+ */
background: linear-gradient(to bottom,  rgba(255,255,255,0) 0%,rgba(255,255,255,1) 100%); /* W3C */
filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient( startColorstr='#00ffffff', endColorstr='#ffffff',GradientType=0 ); /* IE6-9 */

}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, thanks! That looks almost how I imagined it! Thanks a lot! –  user1915969 Dec 19 '12 at 14:58
    
no problem. mark the answer as correct, if you are happy with it :) –  Dogoku Dec 19 '12 at 15:02

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