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I need to read from a file, iterate through it and write the line to another file. When the number of lines reach a threshold, close the output file handle and open a new one.

How do I avoid opening and closing the output file handle every time I read a line from the input file handle as below?

use autodie qw(:all);

my $tot       = 0;
my $postfix   = 'A';
my $threshold = 100;

open my $fip, '<', 'input.txt';
LINE: while (my $line = <$fip>) {
    my $tot += substr( $line, 10, 5 );       
    open my $fop, '>>', 'output_' . $postfix; 
    if ( $tot < $threshold ) {
        print {$fop} $line;
    }
    else {
        $tot = 0;
        $postfix++;
        redo LINE;
    }
    close $fop;
}
close $fip;
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3  
Don't open and close your file inside the for loop. Move the open command above the for loop. –  Eric Leschinski Dec 19 '12 at 14:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Only reopen the file when you change $postfix. Also, you can get a bit simpler.

use warnings;
use strict;
use autodie qw(:all);

my $tot       = 0;
my $postfix   = 'A';
my $threshold = 100;

open my $fop, '>>', 'output_' . $postfix; 
open my $fip, '<', 'input.txt';
while (my $line = <$fip>) {
    $tot += substr( $line, 10, 5 );       

    if ($tot >= $threshold) {
        $tot = 0;
        $postfix++;
        close $fop;
        open $fop, '>>', 'output_' . $postfix; 
    }
    print {$fop} $line;
}
close $fip;
close $fop;
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2  
+1 but I think you should only keep the second part of your answer. –  Sinan Ünür Dec 19 '12 at 14:42
    
And you can add at the bottom: if(tell($fop) != -1) { close $fop; } to close it. –  Tiger-222 Dec 19 '12 at 14:43
4  
You should always error check when you open files. Unless, of course, you are using the autodie module. Which you are. :) –  TLP Dec 19 '12 at 14:48
1  
@TLP: D'oh! Fixed that. –  dan1111 Dec 19 '12 at 14:48
    
@Tiger-222, $fop should always be open at the end of the program, so I think a standard close should be fine. In a small script like this, not bothering to close at all and letting Perl worry about the cleanup would be fine, too. –  dan1111 Dec 19 '12 at 15:02

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