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Okay, so I'm looking at a typical color chooser and it looks something like this:

image

If we deal with only highly saturated colors, the blending pattern behaves like this:

R 255
G 0
B 0

R 255
G 0 -> 255
B 0

R 255
G 255
B 0

R 255 -> 0
G 255
B 0

R 0
G 255
B 0

R 0
G 255
B 0 -> 255

R 0
G 255
B 255

R 0
G 255 -> 0
B 255

R 0
G 0
B 255

R 0 -> 255
G 0
B 255

R 255
G 0
B 255

R 255
G 0
B 255 -> 0

R 255
G 0
B 0

Is it possible to define an interpolating function f which takes a value from 0 to 1 and produces a color on this spectrum (where 0 and 1 correspond to the left and right hand sides of the spectrum posted above)? I only care about highly saturated colors (One component is always 255.). Also, I notice that this pattern blends from R to G to B. However, is there also a similar function which blends between cyan, magenta, and yellow? And while this is not correct, if f(0) produced cyan and f(1) produced yellow, then f(0.5) would produce a green color similar to the one you might achieve if you mixed two paints.

I hope this makes sense. Please feel free to have me clarify anything. Thanks!

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Welcome to StackOverflow! I've added the image for you. Hope that helps. –  Lucas Jones Sep 8 '09 at 18:20
    
Thanks! That was quick! –  Scott Sep 8 '09 at 18:21
1  
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HSL_and_HSV might help. Where the 0-1 range you wanted is 0-360 degrees. –  Pod Sep 8 '09 at 18:22
    
@Pod: That's exactly what he needs - should be an answer instead of a comment. –  mbeckish Sep 8 '09 at 18:25
    
Yes, that's right! Now, is there a scheme that blends more like the electromagnetic spectrum (ROYGBIV)? –  Scott Sep 8 '09 at 18:35
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-color/#hsl-color explains HSL for the scarce CSS3 web and includes a simple HSL->RGB implementation.

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Cool! Yeah, it looks like my function in HSL is just hue from min to max while saturation remains constant. However, is there a scheme that more closely follows the electromagnetic spectrum (ROYGBIV)? –  Scott Sep 8 '09 at 18:34
    
Ah, nevermind this. –  Scott Sep 8 '09 at 18:45
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