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I'm trying to write the following 'while' loop:

int x = N-1, y = 0;

while ( y < M ) {

    /* Some work */

    if ( x > 0 )
        x--;
    else 
        y++;

}

as a 'for' loop. This was my failed attempt:

for ( int x = N-1, y = 0 ; y < M ; ((x>0)?x--:y++) ) {
    /* Some work */
}

This fails to compile since, as the compiler says, the update rule is not a statement.

Do you see any way to naturally write the 'while' loop above as a 'for' loop?

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8  
Why can't you just leave it as a while loop? –  Daniel Dec 19 '12 at 14:46
2  
for ( int x = N-1, y = 0 ; y < M ; ((x>0)?x--:y++) ) { it would be ununderstandable –  Nikolay Kuznetsov Dec 19 '12 at 14:46
    
@Daniel, One reason for that is to keep variable localized in the body of loop. –  Vash - Damian Leszczyński Dec 19 '12 at 14:49
    
@Daniel, it's because the 'for' loop has a place reserved for the updating rule. So, when you read it, you expect to find that functionality there. –  naitoon Dec 19 '12 at 15:03
    
@Nikolay, I agree, but that's one of the reasons to ask. –  naitoon Dec 19 '12 at 15:05
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3 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

To combine the conditions.

 for(int x = N-1, y = 0; y < M ; y += (x > 0)?0:1, x += (x > 0)?-1:0)

I suspect this should really be two loops calling a common method.

 for(int x = N - 1; x >= 0; x--)
     someMethod(x, 0);
 for(int y = 0; y < M; y++)
     someMethod(0, y);
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3  
Technically correct, but please never put this in code. It's so horrifically unreadable. –  Lattyware Dec 19 '12 at 14:51
1  
But it does seem to answer the implied question of how to write the while loop in a for loop using only 3 parameters of the for loop. –  Scott Dec 19 '12 at 14:52
1  
@Vash That was just one of my edits :P –  Peter Lawrey Dec 19 '12 at 14:57
1  
@PeterLawrey. Code should be simple. Just like Brian Kernighan described it once. So +1 for two for loops. –  Vash - Damian Leszczyński Dec 19 '12 at 15:04
1  
Answers like these showing up on Google must be why I see horrible practices in production code. Haha. +1 for the true answer to OP's question, though. –  Jeff Gohlke Dec 19 '12 at 15:05
show 9 more comments

You can always leave the update rule empty

for ( int x = N-1, y = 0 ; y < M ; ) {

 if ( x > 0 )
        x--;
    else 
        y++;

}
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2  
I would ask, at this point, is this actually clearer than the while loop? –  Lattyware Dec 19 '12 at 14:48
1  
It's not really more clear, but the OP doesn't say he wants to make it more clear. He just says he wants a for loop. Mission accomplished, as far as I can see. –  Mark Byers Dec 19 '12 at 14:49
    
@MarkByers Oh, that wasn't criticism of the answer, just a note. –  Lattyware Dec 19 '12 at 14:50
1  
In one small point, yes. The x and y are not accessible outside the loop. –  Vash - Damian Leszczyński Dec 19 '12 at 14:50
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Does

/* Some work */

include the variables x and y? If not, there is an easier way to write the logic of the loop. Currently, your loops counts from N-1 to zero (x) and then from zero to M-1 (y). The entire loop runs (M+N)-1 times.

By combining the initial conditions, you can write:

for (int x = 1; x < M+N; x++) {
    /* Some work */
}

and do away with the y variable altogether.

If you need to keep the x and y variables as those values, just use a third variable:

for (int z = 1; z < M+N; z++) {
    /* Some work */
    (x>0)?x--:y++;
}

Hope this helps!

Jack

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Thanks @Jack. You're right in that an unidimensional parameterization can be the good thing to do, depending on the body of the loop. –  naitoon Dec 19 '12 at 15:31
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