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We have a data model stored in a relational data model that effectively looks like a graph. There is a small number of tables, but the tables are quite large and the types of queries we do are often a 5 join-levels deep. It would be most performant if this data were stored in a graph database, but we dont have that option. How does one achieve graph database-level performance with an RDBMS? What tools can you add on top of the database e.g. caching, search indexes, use an OLAP server that will give you anything close to the performance of a graph database in this situation?

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Wasn't the insufficient performance one of the reasons why graph databases were invented on the first place? If speeding up RDBMS to the order of graph database was possible, why would we need a graph database on the first place? –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Dec 19 '12 at 14:50

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How does one achieve graph database-level performance with an RDBMS?

You don't, at least not in the same way. Both systems have their strengths and weaknesses and trying to apply one to the other will usually end up with a mess. If you are stuck using RDBMS, then design your data model for RDBMS.

What tools can you add on top of the database e.g. caching, search indexes, use an OLAP server that will give you anything close to the performance of a graph database in this situation?

It depends on your data model, perhaps you can elaborate on why you cannot use a Graph Database? Can you have both running side by side?

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The side-by-side idea is actually a potentially interesting idea for us. Effectively having a read-only operational data store. For business reasons, for us, that is a good trade-off to not going full graph. –  BestPractices Jan 4 '13 at 13:31
    
For most people who have already existing Databases, it's usually the only idea. Businesses usually have to keep their records for accounting/security/etc purposes so porting all the data off to neo4j is not a viable alternative, but if you have a specific task, you can often run that task in neo4j. –  Nicholas Jan 4 '13 at 15:34

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