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I'm wondering whether it's acceptable to use tables for forms.

Strictly speaking, name/value pairs are tabular data, aren't they? And a form is just a user customisable set of name/value pairs. So is it right to use tables in this case? Or should I use divs styled with CSS?

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I once used a table to lay out my form and I couldn't get the HTML to compile. –  JMP Sep 8 '09 at 18:33
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I once used a table to lay out my form and I couldn't get the HTML to compile. Come again? What? –  voyager Sep 8 '09 at 18:36
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Not quite a duplicate. I'm asking what's right, not what's easiest. –  Eric Sep 8 '09 at 18:38
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"Name/value pairs are tabular data, aren't they?" It seems more semantically correct to say "this label is for that input" than just "these things are on a row." –  Nathan Long Sep 8 '09 at 22:04
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13 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Both are correct.

I preffer using some div/li, as that allows me to make some different layouts, but tables for forms are not frowned upon.

Actually, by default, Django gives you table formated forms.

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There are plenty of semantics purists that will disagree with this. The question of how to semantically mark up forms is still very much unsettled, but afaik forms aren't strictly considered to be tabular data. There really is no right answer to this, but certainly tables are not the most highly regarded choice, as opposed to lists. Some argue that paragraphs are better - it's really hard to say. "What Django does" adds very little weight to this argument. People will use forms for layout because its easier and, argue that it's semantic when they know it truly isn't. –  Wesley Murch Apr 19 '11 at 4:21
    
Wow I didn't realize how old this was! I got dumped here from a recent post, thought this was current. –  Wesley Murch Apr 19 '11 at 4:31
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Using tables for a form is a big no-no. There is absolutely no need to put a form in tables. –  besluitloos Oct 12 '12 at 13:19
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Both aren't correct. They weren't correct in 2009, and they aren't now. Just because a popular framework defaults to them doesn't mean they are a good thing. I love Django, but there are few times when it is OK to use tables for laying out forms. –  mkelley33 Apr 9 '13 at 3:20
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Try fieldsets

I prefer to break up the fields into logical <fieldset>s with one <legend> each, because:

  • The code is less cluttered
  • The default formatting is user-friendly (I especially like how the legend displays)
  • It's easy to style with CSS

Here's a code example. Note that the labels' for attribute lets you click that label to move focus to the input specified (it matches the id attribute).

<form>
  <fieldset>
    <legend>Wombat Statistics</legend>
    <ol>
      <li>
        <label for="punchstrength">Punch Strength</label>
        <input id="punchstrength" name="punchstrength" />
      </li>
      <li>
        <label for="beverage">Favorite Beverage</label>
        <input id="beverage" name="beverage" />
      </li>
    </ol>
  </fieldset>
  <fieldset>
    <legend>Questions That Are Too Personal</legend>
    <ol>
      <li>
        <label for="creditcard">What is your credit card number?</label>
        <input id="creditcard" name="creditcard" />
      </li>
      <li>
        <label for="gullibility">Did you actually fill that in?</label>
        <input id="gullibility" name="gullibility" />
      </li>
    </ol>
  </fieldset>
</form>

For a basic layout, you can use something like:

label, input, textarea, select { 
  display: inline-block; vertical-align: top; width: 30%; 
}

See this article for a more in-depth tutorial.

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Agree very much. Fieldsets look more like paper forms - at least, as much as possible - with the legend, etc, in less markup than is required for tables. –  MattBelanger Sep 8 '09 at 19:49
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+ 1 for fieldsets + labels. Semantic HTML is really simple, and in case of labels for= add usability even to the worst browsers out there. –  Residuum Sep 8 '09 at 19:49
    
If I want all labels in a form to automatically assume the width of the longest one, is there a simple way to do it without tables? –  AgentRev Dec 11 '13 at 10:09
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A form isn't tabular data.

It's so easy to lay out form elements with CSS, I don't see any value worth obfuscating the markup with tables. Personally, I find that laying out forms with CSS is easier than using tables at this point. For example:

HTML:

<fieldset>
  <label for="FirstName">First Name</label>
  <input type="text" id="FirstName" />

  <label for="LastName">Last Name</label>
  <input type="text" id="LastName" />

  <label for="Age">Age:</label>
  <select id="Age">
    <option>18-24</option>
    <option>25-50</option>
    <option>51-old</option>
  </select>
</fieldset>

CSS:

fieldset {
  overflow: hidden;
  width: 400px;
}

label {
  clear: both;
  float: right;
  padding-right: 10px;
  width: 100px;
}

input, select {
  float: left;
}

Using simple variations on that theme, you can make great-looking, accessible forms that are actually easier to work with than tables anyway. I've used that basic approach and ramped it up to some fairly complex, multi-column data entry forms too, no sweat.

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+ 1 for semantic HTML. –  Residuum Sep 8 '09 at 19:51
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A form is tabular. And form fields represent variable data. –  eyelidlessness Sep 10 '09 at 5:53
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@eyelidlessness: A form is tabular - that completely depends on the data in the form. You can't just thow all forms into one barrel and say Form === Table –  Wesley Murch Apr 19 '11 at 4:28
    
@Madmartigan, I'm struggling to come up with a use case where a form would not be tabular. Can you suggest any? –  eyelidlessness Apr 19 '11 at 17:17
    
The problem is that all data can be considered "tabular", ie it can "go in a spreadheet". But this doesn't mean that on the web we are forced to mark it up as such when better options are available. How about sending an email? Would you really consider that form to be tablular data? –  Wesley Murch Apr 19 '11 at 18:12
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You can use tables. Simple as that.

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Yes

Yes, you may use tables. Div's are supposed to replace tables for page-level layout, but not for, well, tables. Go ahead and use them within pages whenever they solve your problem.

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Is it acceptable? Sure, in that it functions. However, this is not what tables are supposed to be for. A form is not a table. –  ryeguy Sep 8 '09 at 18:30
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Most of my forms have a column for labels followed by a column of input fields. –  David Sep 8 '09 at 18:31
    
We may be in general agreement here. I mean, I don't think most forms should be tables, only ones with table-like appearance. –  DigitalRoss Sep 8 '09 at 18:33
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If forms are not tabular, what are they? Just look at a 1040 tax form. It's a table. –  jmucchiello Sep 8 '09 at 19:12
    
Forms can contain tabular data, it doens't mean "Forms are tables"... –  Wesley Murch Apr 19 '11 at 4:25
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After being the biggest anti table person you can imagine I've started to realize in the end it doesn't matter. Use what's quickest. Of course if you are nesting tables then you have a problem but generally I can't think of a easier way to layout forms. At the end of the day does the client or the visitor give two hoots about whether you used a table or a list?

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Well... yes; they may very well give "two hoots", if the form does not display correctly or if a screen reading keeps talking about table cells and rows when those are unrelated to a form... –  Andrew Barber Sep 21 '12 at 21:28
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it is more likely the form won't display correct if you don't use a table and try using more complex css rules such as with floats to achieve the same result. –  Ryan Mar 25 '13 at 14:55
    
First off, floats are not complex. If a web developer doesn't understand document flow (cssnewbie.com/css-float-property), one needs to seriously spend some time understanding. Second, floats are designed to work within the constraints of the browser size, so the form will display correctly for the user. If this doesn't fit the "design," you also need to have a talk with your creative department. –  Jason T Featheringham Feb 7 at 21:45
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Eric, I would agree with you that form data is tabular data and semantically can live inside a table.

This is the method I use for simple data entry screens.

I wouldn't generally use divs, but possibly an ordered list

<ol>...</ol>

as the form is an ordered list of items also. I find this method a lot hard to style however.

You'll probably get 50/50 split in answers....

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Why an ordered list? Wouldn't a <ul> make more sense? –  jmucchiello Sep 8 '09 at 19:10
    
Yes, I guess a <ul> would make just as much sense, I chose ordered as I guess an input form has some specific order to it (or could have). I'm not sure it makes MORE sense, but maybe as much sense. It's basically and either/or situation. –  RR. Sep 9 '09 at 8:58
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Some people will say yes, some no.

Here's a way for you to decide: If it truly contains tabular data, then it should, at least according to WCAG, have a summary attribute. The summary attribute should describe the purpose and structure of the table for the benefit of screen reader users. Can you write such an attribute? If so, then you should do so, and include it on your table. If you can't, then it probably isn't a really a table and you should look for another way of laying out your form.

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It's important to use labels with the 'for' attribute for screen readers (for usability).

That is why I use fieldsets

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1. The for attribute also provides usability improvements for graphical clients. 2. Fieldsets are not required for label[for]. 3. Using tables does not preclude using fieldsets. –  eyelidlessness Sep 10 '09 at 4:57
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If you're looking for "css purity", you should use something like this:

<form action="http://localhost/Zoleris/" method="post" accept-charset="utf-8">
    <ul class="form">
      <li>
        <label for="username">Username</label>
        <input type="text" id="username" name="username">
      </li>

      <li>
        <label for="password">Password</label>
        <input type="password" id="password" name="password">
      </li>

      <li>
        <input type="checkbox" id="remember_me" name="remember_me" >
        <label class="checkbox" for="remember_me">Remember my username</label>
      </li>

      <li>
        <a href="forgot.php">Forgot your password?</a>
      </li>

      <li>
        <button type="submit" id="btnLogin" name="btnLogin" class="button positive" style="float:right"><img src="tick.png">Login</button>
        <button type="submit" id="btnRegister" name="btnRegister" style="float: left"><img src="cross.png">I need an account!</button>
      </li>
    </ul>
</form>
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You are missing a <fieldset> :) –  voyager Oct 20 '09 at 14:02
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you can use whatever you want, it just that it is a new standard for making the layout of the html forms, and it's kinda like a rule not use table tags for design, but it's still ok to use tables for displaying a table of data (grid)

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I never understood why you would use an ordered or unordered list for forms when a definition list seems more semantically appropriate:

<fieldset>
  <dl>
    <dt><label for="definition">Definition:</label></dt>
    <dd><input type="text" name="definition" /></dd>
  </dl>
</fieldset>

They can be a wee bit trickier to wrangle format-wise, but it always made a lot more sense to me than lists or tables for the vast majority of forms.

Having said that, tables don't seem inappropriate to me for editable tabular data.

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Forms can be or feel tabular, but tables imply a "presentation" along with the semantics. Marking up a form in a table tends to lock the design into a 2-across, field/input layout (assuming you don't want to spend time overriding the table's CSS). Furthmore, you may have to override the styles if you are trying to account for small screens such as mobile phones.

Furthermore, a screen reader will over-announce this form with, "Row 1, column 1, label, 'Name', column 2, input, 'Name'..." instead of simply, "Input, 'Name'..."

My recommendation is to use DIVs, FIELDSETs, or ULs/LIs. This leaves the presentation in the hands of CSS, exactly where it belongs.

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