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I have StartDate (for instance 2011-01-01) and EndDate (for instance 2011-12-31). All my data are placed in this range.

In test plan I need to generate random interval with fixed duration (for 4 cases: 1, 3, 7 days and 1 month long) which are placed in this date range [2011-01-01; 2011-12-31]. Each of these cases must have defined weights.

How should I do to get fixed interval with random Start Date and random End Date (and put these random dates into 2 variables)?

I have found this variant of java-script

The initial script is here:

var startDate = new Date();
startDate.setDate(1);
startDate.setMonth(0);
startDate.setYear(1991);
var startDateTime = startDate.getTime();

var endDate = new Date();
endDate.setDate(31);
endDate.setMonth(11);
endDate.setYear(2003);
var endDateTime = endDate.getTime();

var randomDate = new Date();
var randomDateTime = startDateTime+Math.random()*(endDateTime-startDateTime);
randomDate.setTime(randomDateTime);

var rndDate = randomDate.getDate();
var rndMonth = randomDate.getMonth() + 1;
var rndYear = randomDate.getFullYear();

if (rndDate.toString().length == 1)
rndDate = "0" + rndDate;
if (rndMonth.toString().length == 1)
rndMonth = "0" + rndMonth;

rndDate + "/" + rndMonth + "/" + rndYear;

But I need generate random start date of the fixed interval (which I called ${RandomStartDate}) and then to add the length of the interval to get the end date of it (this date I called ${RandomEndDate}).

Then I have change the script for 1 day long interval (1 day is 86400 seconds):

var startDate = new Date();
startDate.setDate(01);
startDate.setMonth(01);
startDate.setYear(2011);
var startDateTime = startDate.getTime();

var endDate = new Date();
endDate.setDate(31);
endDate.setMonth(12);
endDate.setYear(2011);
var endDateTime = endDate.getTime();

var randomSDate = new Date();
var randomSDateTime = startDateTime+Math.random()*((endDateTime - 86400) -startDateTime );
randomSDate.setTime(randomSDateTime);

var randomEDate = new Date();
var randomEDateTime = (randomSDateTime +  86400);    //add 1 day long interval (86400 s)
randomEDate.setTime(randomEDateTime);   //convert number format to string format of date
var rndSDate = randomSDate.getDate();
var rndSMonth = randomSDate.getMonth()+1 ;
var rndSYear = randomSDate.getFullYear();

var rndEDate = randomEDate.getDate();      
var rndEMonth = randomEDate.getMonth()+1 ;
var rndEYear = randomEDate.getFullYear();

if (rndSDate.toString().length == 1)      
rndSDate = "0" + rndSDate;
if (rndSMonth.toString().length == 1)
rndSMonth = "0" + rndSMonth;

if (rndEDate.toString().length == 1)      
rndEDate = "0" + rndEDate;
if (rndEMonth.toString().length == 1)
rndEMonth = "0" + rndEMonth;

var RandomStartDate = rndSYear + "-" + rndSMonth + "-" + rndSDate;
vars.put ("RandomStartDate", RandomStartDate);

var RandomEndDate = rndEYear + "-" + rndEMonth + "-" + rndEDate;
vars.put ("RandomEndDate", RandomEndDate);

But this script generates RandomEndDate which is equal to RandomStartDate. If I generate RandomStartDate separately (without the parts of code which are connected with RandomEndDate) the script works good.

Could you help me, please? What is wrong?

share|improve this question
1  
The Date instance uses milliseconds as value, so to add 1 day, you need to add the number of millies per day, 86400000, not the number of seconds per day. –  rsp Dec 20 '12 at 21:00
    
@rsp, thanks. Yes, this was the cause. I have found and fix it. –  Nadezhda T Dec 22 '12 at 13:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can do it in Beanshell with much less amount of code:

import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Calendar;

calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
calendar.set(2011, 0, 1);
startTime = calendar.getTimeInMillis();
calendar.set(2012, 11, 31);
endTime = calendar.getTimeInMillis();
randomTime1 = startTime + (long)(Math.random()*(endTime-startTime));
randomTime2 = randomTime1 + (long)(Math.random()*(endTime - randomTime1)+86400000);

formatter = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd");
calendar.setTimeInMillis(randomTime1);
vars.put("start", formatter.format(calendar.getTime()));
calendar.setTimeInMillis(randomTime2);
vars.put("end", formatter.format(calendar.getTime()));
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, your variant is more compact! May be, it should be: randomTime1 = startTime + (long)(Math.random()*(endTime-startTime - 86400000)); randomTime2 = randomTime1 + 86400000; for 1 day long interval? It seems to me, that script randomTime1 = startTime + (long)(Math.random()*(endTime-startTime)); randomTime2 = randomTime1 + (long)(Math.random()*(endTime - randomTime1)+1); gets for us both random dates, am I right? Thanks! –  Nadezhda T Dec 22 '12 at 10:32
    
And why do you prefer to use BeanShell for this? What is practical difference between using BeanShell and BSF for this generation? (I put script in BSF, but I don't know, which PreProcessor is better for this case and why. And I will be gratefull to you if you could explain the difference, please?). –  Nadezhda T Dec 22 '12 at 11:52
    
@user1900369 thank you. I've made a small update. I haven't changed code for randomTime1 as it already has max date 2012-12-30 –  Andrey Botalov Dec 22 '12 at 12:03
1  
@user1900369 BSF supports a lot of languages, not only Beanshell. I think it's the only difference. I wrote it in Beanshell as it was good enough for me –  Andrey Botalov Dec 22 '12 at 12:05
    
O, thanks for your explanations! )) –  Nadezhda T Dec 22 '12 at 13:33

I have found the solution!

This is the correct script, which allow to model the random interval with fixed length (1 day long interval) and get 2 variables fot it start and end - ${RandomStartDate} and ${RandomEndDate}:

var startDate = new Date();
startDate.setDate(01);
startDate.setMonth(01);
startDate.setYear(2011);
var startDateTime = startDate.getTime();

var endDate = new Date();
endDate.setDate(31);
endDate.setMonth(12);
endDate.setYear(2011);
var endDateTime = endDate.getTime();

var randomSDate = new Date();
var randomSDateTime = startDateTime+Math.random()*((endDateTime - 86400000) -startDateTime );
randomSDate.setTime(randomSDateTime);

var randomEDate = new Date();
var randomEDateTime = (randomSDateTime + 86400000);    //add 1 day long interval (86400000 ms)
randomEDate.setTime(randomEDateTime);   //convert number format to string format of date
var rndSDate = randomSDate.getDate();
var rndSMonth = randomSDate.getMonth()+1 ;
var rndSYear = randomSDate.getFullYear();

var rndEDate = randomEDate.getDate();      
var rndEMonth = randomEDate.getMonth()+1 ;
var rndEYear = randomEDate.getFullYear();

if (rndSDate.toString().length == 1)      
rndSDate = "0" + rndSDate;
if (rndSMonth.toString().length == 1)
rndSMonth = "0" + rndSMonth;

if (rndEDate.toString().length == 1)      
rndEDate = "0" + rndEDate;
if (rndEMonth.toString().length == 1)
rndEMonth = "0" + rndEMonth;

var RandomStartDate = rndSYear + "-" + rndSMonth + "-" + rndSDate;
vars.put ("RandomStartDate", RandomStartDate);

var RandomEndDate = rndEYear + "-" + rndEMonth + "-" + rndEDate;
vars.put ("RandomEndDate", RandomEndDate);

My mistake was I thought that the time is in seconds, but it is in milliseconds!

share|improve this answer
    
You can do it with much less amount of code –  Andrey Botalov Dec 21 '12 at 20:25

For situations like this I would opt to put the complexity outside of jMeter, and create a perl script to generate 100 pairs of dates according to your requirements and read them into jMeter variables using CSV Data Set Config.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I thought about this way. But I don't imagine how to genarate data, and then how to decide what minimum quantity of generated data will be enough for evenly random choise in my case. Therefore I have found the java-script and try to change it, but have some small problems with getting the end date of random interval (the start date of interval is generated correctly). May be, you can help me? –  Nadezhda T Dec 20 '12 at 20:42

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