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I have a two classes "User Profile" and "FingerprintProfile" which extend an abstract class "Profile".

Profile:

/**
 * Template for User profiles or Fingerprint profiles
 */
public abstract class Profile {

    /**
     * Profile Name
     */
    private String name;

    /**
     * Profile id
     */
    private int id;

    /**
     * Set the name of this profile
     * @param name
     */
    public void setProfileName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    /**
     * Set the id of this profile
     * @param name
     */
    public void setIdNumber(int id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    /**
     * Get the name of this profile
     */
    public String getProfileName() {

        return name;

    }

    /**
     * Get the id of this profile
     */
    public int getIdNumber() {
        return id;
    }

}

My next class is UserProfile

public class UserProfile extends Profile {

    /**
     * Users password
     */
    private char[] password;

    /**
     * Set User password
     * @param password
     */
    public void setPassword(char[] password){

        this.password = password;

    }

    /**
     * Get User password
     */
    public char[] getPassword(){

        return password;

    }

}

Just looking at this class seems dodgy, it seems totally wrong to be able to retrieve the password like this (Even if the get method is private).

It seems like I will be facing the same problem when making my FingerPrintProfile class as well as that holds a "FingerprintData" Object which inherently also needs to be secure.

Does anybody know of a secure method, or preferably a pattern which people use to solve a scenario such as this one?

Thanks !

Bonus Question

I made the abstract class to provide a template for both types of profile, and it seems there is a common ground between the fingerprint data and the text password. However, it is not possible to make an abstract field "password" which can potentially be a char array or a FingerprintData object. Any ideas??

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Is the password encrypted? –  Vincent Ramdhanie Dec 19 '12 at 15:25
    
char[] setPassword() :) –  UmNyobe Dec 19 '12 at 15:27
    
Nope the password isn't encrypted, what your looking at is the stage of development I'm at. –  Tom celic Dec 19 '12 at 15:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use "object thinking" instead. Your current design is not OOP at all. Instead of setting and getting the password you should expose behavior of the profile. For example:

interface Profile {
  void rename(String name);
  String identity();
  boolean authenticate(char[] password)
}

Getters/setters is an anti-pattern in OOP.

share|improve this answer
    
So should I fill in the name / password fields in the concrete class? –  Tom celic Dec 23 '12 at 16:09
    
also can I have a different authenticate method for each class i.e Fingerprint vs. User ? –  Tom celic Dec 23 '12 at 16:13
    
it's up to your implementation how authenticate() should use the provided password to authenticate (or reject) a user. The point is that your class should NOT expose the password (via getters) but should encapsulate it and expose behavior. –  yegor256 Dec 24 '12 at 10:34
    
This is my preferred way to go, because it allows you to implement encrypted passwords (instead of clear text passwords) without changing the API. –  Jin Kim Dec 24 '12 at 18:17
    
Hmm, getters/setters is indeed an anti-pattern, but I also thought that OO was supposed to model the real world, and in the real world, usually I hand over Credentials to some kind of Authenticator and they look at the Credentials which has my UserProfile printed on it and say, yep, this looks legit. I don't know if that's how it works in other countries. ;) –  Trejkaz Mar 18 at 23:21

When working with passwords you probably should use some form of encryption so the password is not stored in plain text. You can read up on how this works here.

Here is a link to a Java implementation of Bcrypt, which should at least get you started.

share|improve this answer

Does anybody know of a secure method, or preferably a pattern which people use to solve a scenario such as this one?

You need to ask yourself "secure against what?".

Sure if some untrusted code is executed in the same JVM as this class, it could get hold of the password. But why would you allow that to happen?

  • You cannot secure in-memory data against untrusted code running with with full privilege in the same JVM.

  • If you are careful, you can secure data against untrusted code running in a security sandbox; e.g. by creating custom a Permission and using the SecurityManager to check that the caller of (say) the getPassword method has the required permission. (And you need to do a few other things too ...)


Having said that, the "best practice" way to handle passwords is to create and store a seeded hash using a (really) secure hashing algorithm. You could do the same thing here. The catch is that if you actually need the passwords in clear, that won't work ... because the whole idea of the hash is to make it infeasible to recover the password. But the flip-side is that if the password is ever in clear, the bad guy could potentially capture it.

Storing the password encrypted is not secure against untrusted code in your JVM. Given time, effort, and a covert information channel between the untrusted to the bad guy, it should be possible to recover the key and algorithm used, and hence decrypt the data. And the bad guy can potentially get hold of the information via a core dump or by reading the paging file for the JVM process.

The bottom line is that if your platform security is breached (either the JVM or the OS), you cannot guarantee that passwords held in clear or encrypted will remain secure.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply, that's what I meant when I said it just "seemed" wrong. It just didn't seem right that an objects field can hold a password in plain text. If a OS storing passwords doesn't, why should my application? –  Tom celic Dec 19 '12 at 15:37

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