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I am currently running into some performance issues when running a query which joins multiple tables. The main table has 170 million records, so it is pretty big.

What I encounter is that when I run the query with a top 1000 clause, the results are instantaneous. However, when I increase that to top 8000 the query easily runs for 15 minutes (and then I kill it). Through trial and error I found that the tipping point is with Top 7934 (works like a charm) and Top 7935 (Runs for ever)

Does someone recognise this behaviour and sees what I am doing wrong? Maybe my Query is faulty in some respects.

Thanks in advance

SELECT  top 7934 h.DocIDBeg
    ,h.[Updated By]
    ,h.Action
    ,h.Type
    ,h.Details
    ,h.[Update Date]
    ,h.[Updated Field Name]
    ,i.Name AS 'Value Set To'
    ,COALESCE(i.Name,'') + COALESCE(h.NewValue, '') As 'Value Set To'
    ,h.OldValue
FROM
    (SELECT  g.DocIDBeg
            ,g.[Updated By]
            ,g.Action
            ,g.Type
            ,g.Details
            ,g.[Update Date]
            ,CAST(g.details as XML).value('auditElement[1]/field[1]/@name','nvarchar(max)') as 'Updated Field Name'
            ,CAST(g.details as XML).value('(/auditElement//field/setChoice/node())[1]','nvarchar(max)') as 'value'
            ,CAST(g.details as XML).value('(/auditElement//field/newValue/node())[1]','nvarchar(max)') as 'NewValue'
            ,CAST(g.details as XML).value('(/auditElement//field/oldValue/node())[1]','nvarchar(max)') as 'OldValue'
    FROM(
            SELECT a.ArtifactID
                  ,f.DocIDBeg
                  ,b.FullName AS 'Updated By'
                  ,c.Action
                  ,e.ArtifactType AS 'Type'
                  ,a.Details
                  ,a.TimeStamp AS 'Update Date'
            FROM [EDDS1015272].[EDDSDBO].[AuditRecord] a
                        LEFT JOIN [EDDS1015272].[EDDSDBO].AuditUser b
                            ON a.UserID = b.UserID
                        LEFT JOIN [EDDS1015272].[EDDSDBO].AuditAction c
                            ON a.Action = c.AuditActionID
                        LEFT JOIN [EDDS1015272].[EDDSDBO].[Artifact] d
                            ON a.ArtifactID = d.ArtifactID
                        LEFT JOIN [EDDS1015272].[EDDSDBO].[ArtifactType] e
                            ON d.ArtifactTypeID = e.ArtifactTypeID
                        INNER JOIN [EDDS1015272].[EDDSDBO].[Document] f
                            ON a.ArtifactID = f.ArtifactID
            ) g
    ) h
LEFT JOIN [EDDS1015272].[EDDSDBO].[Code] i
ON h.value = i.ArtifactID
share|improve this question
    
Show your query plan. –  David Brabant Dec 19 '12 at 15:43
2  
The behavior is even named 'tipping point': The Index Tipping Point –  Remus Rusanu Dec 19 '12 at 15:51
    
Thanks for the quick reply. @David What is the best method of posting the execution plan here? It is quite comprenhansive –  Jaco Struik Dec 19 '12 at 16:03

3 Answers 3

I used to work with data warehouses a lot and encountered similar problems quite often. The root cause is obviously in memory usage like it was already mentioned here. I don't think that rewriting your query will help a lot if you really need to query all 170 million records and I don't think that it is OK for you to wait for more memory resources. So here is just a simple workaround from me:

Try to split your query. For example, first query all data you need from AuditRecord record table joined to AuditUser table and store the result in another(temporary table for example) table. Then join this new table with Artifact table and so on. In this case this steps will require less memory one by one then running the whole query and have it hung out. So in the long run you will have not a query but a scrip which will be easy to track as you can print out some statuses in the console and which will do his job unlike the query which never ends

Also make sure that you really need to query all this data at once, because I can think of no use cases why you need it, but still if it is an application then you should implement paging, if it is some export functionality then maybe there is a timeline you can use to batch data. For example to export data on a daily basis and query only the data from yersterday. In this case you will come up with an incremental export.

share|improve this answer

"Through trial and error I found that the tipping point is with Top 7934 (works like a charm) and Top 7935 (Runs for ever)"

This sounds very much like a spill. Adam Mechanic does a nice demo of the internals of this in the video below. Basically the top forces a sort which requires memory. If the memory grant is not big enough to complete the operation, some of it gets done on disk.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j5YGdIk3DXw

Go to 1:03:50 to see Adam demo a spill. In his query, 668,935 rows do not spill but 668,936 rows do and the query time more than doubles.

Watch the whole session if you have time. Very good for performance tuning!

Could also be the tipping point, as @Remus suggested, but it's all guessing without knowing the actual plan.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the link. I will have a look at the video. I am currently trying to figure out how to actually get the execution plan on stakoverflow –  Jaco Struik Dec 19 '12 at 16:04

i think the subselects are forcing the server to fetch all before the filter can be applied this will couse more memory usage (xlm fields) and make it hard to use a decent qry plan

as to the strange top behavior: top has a big influence on qry plan generation. it is possible that the 7935 is a cutoff point for 1 optimal plan and that sql server will choose a different path when it needs to fetch more. or it could go back to the memory and run out of mem on 7935

update:

i reworked your qry to eliminate the nested selects, i'm not saying its now going to be that mutch faster but it eliminates some fields that werent used and it should be easyer to understand and optimize based on the qry plan. since we don't now the exact size of each table and we can hardly run the qry to test its impossible to give you the best answer. but i could try some tips:

1 step would be to check if you need all the left joins and turn them into inner if it is not needed ex: AuditUser, an AuditRecord could always have a user?

an other thing you could try is to put the data of preferably the smaller tables in a tmp table and join the bigger tables to that tmp table, possible eliminating a lot of records to join

if possible you could denormalize a bit and for example put the username in the auditrecord 2 so you would eliminate the join on AuditUser alltogether

but it is up to wat you need wat you can/are allowed to and the data/server

SELECT  top 7934 f.DocIDBeg
    ,b.FullName AS 'Updated By'
    ,c.Action
    ,e.ArtifactType AS 'Type'
    ,a.Details
    ,a.TimeStamp AS 'Update Date'
    ,CAST(a.Details as XML).value('auditElement[1]/field[1]/@name','nvarchar(max)') as 'Updated Field Name'
    ,i.Name AS 'Value Set To'
    ,COALESCE(i.Name,'') + COALESCE(CAST(a.Details as XML).value('(/auditElement//field/newValue/node())[1]','nvarchar(max)') as 'NewValue', '') As 'Value Set To'
    ,CAST(a.Details as XML).value('(/auditElement//field/oldValue/node())[1]','nvarchar(max)') as 'OldValue'
FROM [EDDS1015272].[EDDSDBO].[AuditRecord] a
                        LEFT JOIN [EDDS1015272].[EDDSDBO].AuditUser b
                            ON a.UserID = b.UserID
                        LEFT JOIN [EDDS1015272].[EDDSDBO].AuditAction c
                            ON a.Action = c.AuditActionID
                        LEFT JOIN [EDDS1015272].[EDDSDBO].[Artifact] d
                            ON a.ArtifactID = d.ArtifactID
                        LEFT JOIN [EDDS1015272].[EDDSDBO].[ArtifactType] e
                            ON d.ArtifactTypeID = e.ArtifactTypeID
                        INNER JOIN [EDDS1015272].[EDDSDBO].[Document] f
                            ON a.ArtifactID = f.ArtifactID
                        LEFT JOIN [EDDS1015272].[EDDSDBO].[Code] i
                            ON CAST(a.details as XML).value('(/auditElement//field/setChoice/node())[1]','nvarchar(max)') = i.ArtifactID
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. Much appreciated. Since I am pretty new to SQL, I don't see how I could restructure the query so it will not need the subselects. Any idea on that? –  Jaco Struik Dec 19 '12 at 16:14
    
basicly you take the from clouse from your lowest select and move that to the from from the first select then you can take all the fields from the tables themselves. if you want more info i can help more tomorrow (leaving time here ;)) –  ufosnowcat Dec 19 '12 at 16:57

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